conditional

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conditional

(kən-dĭsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Imposing, depending on, or containing a condition.
2. Psychology Brought about by conditioning.

con·di′tion·al′i·ty (-dĭsh′ə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
con·di′tion·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers the theoretical background, computing the maximum entropy distribution under aggregating semantics, handling deterministic conditionals, improving the computation of ME.
Our assumption is that these conditionals are indeed semantically equivalent in the sense that both are usually interpreted as biconditional (Espino et al., 2013; Montolio, 2000).
The second reason why exceptive conditionals, such as except if, have attracted little attention from psycholinguists and cognitive psychologists has to do with the idea that for some authors, except if and unless are semantically equivalent (Declerck & Reed, 2000; Geis, 1973; Montolio, 2000).
The probability of conditionals: The psychological evidence.
The opportunity has arisen because conditionals at the yard have been so successful over the years that they soon progress to become fully-fledged jockeys.
Conditional expressions (although the classification is not accepted by all linguists) are usually divided into two: the so-called real or open conditionals, which are sometimes called indicative conditionals, and the unreal or hypothetical conditionals, also known as subjunctive conditionals (see Nieuwint 1992 : 2-3; Palmer 1986 : 189-199).
Consequently, the model theory postulates that initial representations for the conditionals p and q, p only if q, and p if q are different (these are summarized in Table 2).
Another important parameter discussed in these chapters is Fillmore's concept of "epistemic stance", which, in conditionals, refers to the speaker's mental association with or dissociation from the situation described in the protasis.
According to Bayesian epistemology, the epistemically rational agent updates his beliefs by conditionalization: that is, his posterior subjective probability after taking account of evidence X, [p.sub.new], is to be set equal to his prior conditional probability [p.sub.old](X).
As the title suggests, most of the essays focus on probability and the logic of conditionals, and the relationship between them; they draw their inspiration from Adams's seminal work on the subject.
(A defender of the latter definition can't, as we have just seen, complain that the new definition has different and therefore unacceptable implications.) If so, then, precisely because the new definition uses a conditional in its statement, one can't appeal to the notion of conditional probability thus defined in order to explicate conditionals: the notion of conditionality is the prior notion.

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