condensation

(redirected from condensations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

condensation

 [kon″den-sa´shun]
1. the act of rendering or process of becoming more compact; compression.
2. the packing of dental filling material into a prepared tooth cavity.
3. a mental process in which one symbol stands for a number of components and contains all the emotions associated with them.
4. conversion from the gaseous state to the liquid or solid state; gas liquefaction.

con·den·sa·tion

(kon'den-sā'shŭn),
1. Making denser or more solid.
2. The change of a gas to a liquid, or of a liquid to a solid.
3. In psychoanalysis, an unconscious mental process in which one symbol stands for a number of others.
4. In dentistry, the process of packing a filling material into a cavity, using such force and direction that no voids result.
5. A chemical reaction in which two or more molecular entities combine, with the concomitant release of a molecule of water, ammonia, alcohol, or some other simple entity.
[L. con-denso, pp. -atus, to make thick, condense]

condensation

/con·den·sa·tion/ (kon″den-sa´shun)
1. conversion from a gaseous to a liquid or solid phase.
2. compression (1).
3. the packing of dental filling materials into a tooth cavity.
4. a mental process in which one symbol stands for a number of components and contains all the emotions associated with them.

condensation

(kŏn′dĕn-sā′shən, -dən-)
n.
1. The act of condensing.
2. The state of being condensed.
3. An abridgment or shortening of something, especially of a written work or speech.
4. Physics
a. The process by which a gas or vapor changes to a liquid.
b. The liquid so formed.
5. Chemistry A chemical reaction in which water or another simple substance is released by the combination of two or more molecules.
6. Psychology The process by which a single symbol or word is associated with the emotional content of several, not necessarily related, ideas, feelings, memories, or impulses, especially as expressed in dreams.

con′den·sa′tion·al adj.

condensation

[kon′dənsā′shən]
Etymology: L, condensare, to make thick
1 a reduction to a denser form, such as from water vapor to a liquid.
2 (in psychology) a process, often present in dreams, in which two or more concepts are fused so that a single symbol represents the multiple components. In some cases of schizophrenia condensation, several thoughts and feelings fuse into a single verbal or nonverbal message and may be expressed in repetitive statements or gestures that can have a variety of meanings.

con·den·sa·tion

(kon'dĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. Making more solid or dense.
2. The change of a gas to a liquid, or of a liquid to a solid.
3. psychoanalysis An unconscious mental process in which one symbol stands for a number of others.
4. dentistry The process of packing a filling material into a cavity, using such force and direction that no voids result.
[L. con-denso, pp. -atus, to make thick, condense]

condensation (knˈ·den·sāˑ·shn),

n 1. change in phase of a substance from a gas or vapor phase to a liquid or solid phase.
2. the process of combining two different molecules by eliminating a simple molecule like water.

con·den·sa·tion

(kon'dĕn-sā'shŭn)
In dentistry, the process of packing a filling material into a cavity, using such force and direction that no voids result.
[L. con-denso, pp. -atus, to make thick, condense]

condensation (kän´densā´shən),

n a commonly used term for the insertion and compression or compaction of dental materials into a prepared cavity. Compaction is a more accurate term than condensation. See also compaction.

condensation

1. the act of rendering, or the process of becoming, more compact.
2. the process of passing from a gaseous to a liquid or solid phase. In animal housing this is a matter of great importance because of the need for a dry environment as a prevention against the spread of infection, especially those spread by inhalation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Attempts to do the same with molecules made of bosonic atoms failed, however, because collisions shattered those molecules before condensation could take place.
Kate Madden, by email AVENTILATION is the best way to tackle condensation.