concupiscence

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concupiscence

A theological term for ardent, usually sensual, longing or lust for an object, person or experience.

concupiscence

Horniness, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
24) In fact, the instinctual and deficient intellectual characteristics of the sins of the concupiscent appetite punished in upper Hell ethically correspond to the world-wide state of linguistic confusion that initially resulted from Babel.
Although the human person, saved by the redeeming love of Christ, is essentially good, the concupiscent tendency remains as a residual effect or wound of original sin.
Words such as lethiferous, facinorous, concupiscent, marmoreal, and peculations (p.
Its cup runs over with the ripening sex urge in teenage kids, wretched marriages, illegitimate offspring, adultery and assorted other concupiscent adventures.
6) Or perhaps she imagined the luscious, brown-skinned fruit as a fitting image for a concupiscent black protagonist's narrative.
the irascible, concupiscent, and emotive individual, even when those
I've never understood why we expect our politicians to be less concupiscent than the rest of us.
Zeffirelli's fast-moving film left out most of Hamlet's lines but made sure no one would miss the sexual tension between the prince and concupiscent queen.
Sylvester Graham, a New England clergyman of the 19th century, maintained that sweet, rich foods (among others) could "increase the concupiscent excitability and sensibility of the genital organs.
Instead we get earthy, domestic drama: Claudius and Gertrude, each dressed in crimson, roll in the ground in concupiscent oblivion.
Lately, his plays have tended to center on a male figure, cross-examined by concupiscent women and brutish men, who attempts to control his attackers only to embrace, finally, the madness with catharsis, revelry and, usually, public nudity.
52) In article 81, Descartes repudiates the distinction between benevolent and concupiscent love, a distinction that makes sense only if the relation of the subject to the object is the defining characteristic of the passion.