concubine

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concubine

A woman in a continuous, quasi-marital relationship with a man whom she cannot marry for various reasons—e.g., due to lower socioeconomic status or because the man is already married.
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References in periodicals archive ?
marriage or concubinage relationship, (145) and where the courts have
The Supreme Court of South Dakota found that a Mexican concubinage was not the legal equivalent of a common law marriage because it does not confer the same obligations and rights as a common law marriage.
When concubinage leads to monogamous, common law marriages, women suffer because they cannot receive the legal benefits of the union.
Concubinage was the next best option, providing a marriage-like environment for bachelor noble men, as well as for many unmarried or widowed women from across the social spectrum.
Mais voilEa que cette fin 2006, le nouveau couple vivant en concubinage, vient de se sE[umlaut]parer.
At one point, Abd-Allah tantalizingly informs us that Webb's booklet Islam and America sets forth the author's views on "a number of controversial topics like slavery, concubinage, and jihad," [201] but no elaboration follows.
Examining the rhetorical structure of their oration and accounts from spectators, Zackodnik illuminates how Remond and Craft carefully managed their public selves as they spoke of topics ranging from the concubinage of female slaves to the Margaret Garner case.
But given the standing accorded to concubinage, not to mention slavery, during Biblical times, it seems unlikely he'd have faced Jesus' censure over the hapless Miss Hemings.
The language of the indictment only complicated matters by naming his relationship as concubinage. Law enforcement authorities clearly assumed that concubinage was an immoral purpose within the meaning of the Act.
Foot-binding, female infanticide, concubinage, and illiteracy were commonplace.
Translation as well as exegesis of biblical texts and paradigms is done almost exclusively by males, so questions of marital or concubinage relations are not as transparent as they need to be for the understanding of African women and their situation.