concretion


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concretion

 [kon-kre´shun]
1. a calculus or hard inorganic mass in a natural cavity or in tissue.
2. abnormal union of adjacent parts.
3. the process of becoming harder or more solid.

con·cre·tion

(kon-krē'shŭn),
The formation of solid material by aggregation of discrete units or particles.
[L. cum, together, + crescere, to grow]

concretion

/con·cre·tion/ (kon-kre´shun)
1. a calculus or inorganic mass in a natural cavity or in tissue.
2. abnormal union of adjacent parts.
3. the process of becoming harder or more solid.

concretion

(kən-krē′shən)
n.
Medicine A solid mass, usually composed of inorganic material, formed in a cavity or tissue of the body; a calculus.

con·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

concretion

See calculus.

con·cre·tion

(kŏn-krē'shŭn)
Formation of solid material by the aggregation of discrete units or particles.
[L. cum, together, + crescere, to grow]

concretion

A solid mass of chalky or inorganic material formed in a cavity or tissue of the body. A CALCULUS.

concretion

1. a calculus or inorganic mass in a natural cavity or in tissue.
2. abnormal union of adjacent parts.
3. a process of becoming harder or more solid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chun (1880) first observed that statolith concretions (he thought they were solely extracellular products) arise in the epithelial floor along the tentacular plane on opposite sides of the statocyst cavity.
Gasparatos D, Haidouti C, Tarcnidis D (2004) Characterization of iron oxides in Fe-rich concretions from an imperfectly-drained Greek soil: a study by selective-dissolution techniques and X-ray diffraction.
Concretions are a mixed blessing for maritime archeologists: Although they can help preserve the artifacts they encase, they also conceal their contents.
Ethical subjectivity guarantees the concretion of what the idea is in itself and its own actuality is guaranteed in the idea.
Thirty-five spoons have been identified to date, and one or two more may still be in concretion.
k] are also Public, and we obtain E [assertion sign] A:OkCPublic by (Level Concretion Public).
Like most shipwreck artifacts, the cannons were found covered with a grayish concretion, an inch-thick, rock-hard crust of sand, salt, and calcium carbonate, a chemical compound found in seashells.
The old theory of objects that ingress in events is turning into an elaborate theory of a hierarchy of relational "eternal objects" and their potential for ingression into events, giving rise to the need for a principle of concretion, God.
Arion has no grasp of abstraction; his life is a concretion of concretes, for him like the images of a book.
Composition as a process of renotation which proceeds from concretion to idea (the reverse of conventional practice).
Marx certainly thought that the homogenizing tendency of the law masked the specificity and concretion that the economic world relied upon.
THIS PRESS RELEASE CONCRETION TO CASH EARNINGS AND REPORTED EARNINGS THAT WILL BE REALIZED FROM THE PROPOSED MERGER; (B) THE IMPACT ON REVENUES OF THE PROPOSED MERGER, INCLUDING THE POTENTIAL FOR ENHANCED REVENUES AND THE IMPACT ON REVENUES OF CONSOLIDATION OF RETAIL BRANCHES AND OTHER OPERATIONS AS PLANNED; (C) AHMANSON'S STOCK PURCHASE PROGRAM; AND (D) THE RESTRUCTURING CHARGES EXPECTED TO BE INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH THE PROPOSED MERGER.