concrescence


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concrescence

 [kon-kres´ens]
a growing together of parts originally separate.

con·cres·cence

(kon-kres'ens),
1. Synonym(s): coalescence
2. In dentistry, the union of the roots of two adjacent teeth by cementum.
[see concrement]

concrescence

(kən-krĕs′əns)
n.
1. Biology The growing together of related parts, tissues, or cells.
2. The amassing of physical particles.

con·cres′cent adj.

con·cres·cence

(kŏn-kres'ĕns)
1. Synonym(s): coalescence.
2. dentistry The union of the roots of two adjacent teeth by cementum.

con·cres·cence

(kŏn-kres'ĕns)
In dentistry, the union of the roots of two adjacent teeth by cementum.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Through the shekinah, Whitehead's two poles are brought together, and there is an opportunity for concrescence. Second, the Spirit-in-process bears witness to negative prehensions, the suffering and isolation of a closed system, while simultaneously pointing towards resurrection in the form of God's invitation to concrescence.
As illustrated below, Whitehead's Categorical Logic traces the process of concrescence in terms of a detailed series of stages and phases.
This concrescence of an actual entity toward some one aim ("final causality") is its process of becoming, distinguishable from its acts of inheritance from the past ("efficient causality"), and which gives rise to the process of temporal transition.
In modern periods, while Newton wondered what sets planets in motion, and Einstein's and Bohr's debate on whether "God plays dice," Whitehead gave God a central position in his cosmology in which "the concrescence of an actual occasion is a description of the metaphysical means by which God and the world continually co-create one another." (37)
The accumulation of these entities can produce new becomings--because they encounter each other in so many ways, because they can be apprehended in so many ways, and because they exhibit 'concrescence'." Amin and Thrift (2002j page 27)
Gemination fusion, twinning and concrescence. Journal of Dentistry for Children 1965;32:93-100.
Thus, the Taoist teaching of cultivating egoless selfhood aims to free a person from the four great hindrances of preconceptions, predeterminations, obduracy and egoism stipulated by Confucius in order to bring out what is hidden within the self to activate the process of concrescence or unity within multiplicity (Chang, 1963).
The concrescence of the many acts of prehending into the one actual entity, which is an experience of the entire universe as actual and possible from that unique place in space-time, gives rise in Whitehead to two types for process.
This life span of actual entities is understood as a process of attaining 'satisfactions' or 'achievements' with 'concrescence' the word used to describe the phase of growth that entities undergo in achieving their satisfactions, signifying the growing together of many into the unity of one.
he grounded this humanism in Whitehead's metaphysics, arguing that the present is ontologically prior to past or future, that "the present is characterized by actuality in the sense of actualization or activity, only present existents are agents." In mounting this last argument Kline was on very well-prepared ground: one of his most widely hailed contributions to process philosophy was his treatment of "Form, Concrescence and Concretum" in Explorations in Whitehead's Philosophy, edited by Lewis S.
By unpacking the key concepts of 'occasion', 'prehension', and 'concrescence', the object in question is gradually transformed from discrete thing to processual event, with a number of consequences for materialist thought.
The subject of experience expires once it has completed its process of concrescence. Presumably all that remains is the objective result of the subject's self-constituting "decision": in the first place, a pattern or form that brought into harmony all the "feelings" derived from the subject's multiple prehensions of the world around it; and in the second place, the unified feeling or set of feelings accompanying that same form or pattern.