concentric hypertrophy


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Related to concentric hypertrophy: eccentric hypertrophy

con·cen·tric hy·per·tro·phy

thickening of the walls of the heart or any cavity with apparent diminution of the capacity of the cavity.

con·cen·tric hy·per·tro·phy

(kŏn-sen'trik hī-pĕr'trō-fē)
Thickening of the walls of the heart or any cavity with apparent diminution of the capacity of the cavity.

concentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which the walls of an organ become thickened without enlargement but with diminished capacity.
See also: hypertrophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 3: Representative concentric hypertrophy protein products extracted from the left ventricles of study rats in each group, control rats; IA, induced aging rats; AL, AOF low; AM, AOF medium; AH, AOF high, were measured using Western blotting.
(a) Parasternal long axis view (a) showed severe concentric hypertrophy of interventricular septum (IVS) and LV free wall, but without an echogenic mass in the apex.
Many studies have found concentric hypertrophy in the hearts of trained rats and mice, although their training protocols are controversial.
Hypertensive Response to Exercise And the Left Ventricle HNTRE No HTNRE Number of patients 136 270 left ventricular measurement Mass (mean) 199 g 184g Mass index (mean) 96 g/[m.sup.2] 103 g/[m,sup.2] Concentric hypertrophy (prevalence) 25% 16% Eccentric hypertrophy (prevalence) 12% 7.4% Note: HTNRE = hypertensive response to exercise Source: Dr.
Long-standing hypertension triggers concentric hypertrophy and increases LV passive stiffness, which leads to impaired LV diastolic function and then to the development of decompensated heart failure.
The overload of pressure can result in arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and, occasionally, aortic stenosis, causing LV concentric hypertrophy (increase in mass secondary to increase in myocyte thickness, without significant alteration in ventricular volume and relative thickness).
Long-term hypertension is an influence on ventricular hypertrophy development, specifically concentric hypertrophy (Verdecchia et al.
This remodeling finally results in the concentric hypertrophy of LV, i.e.
In clinical understanding, the term "structural remodeling" refers usually to changes in the LVH shape in terms of eccentric and concentric hypertrophy. However, the changed shape of the left ventricle is conditioned by underlying changes at tissue, cellular and subcellular levels and these changes have been reported already in early stages of hypertension and LVH, both in animal models and in humans (21, 22).
The left and right ventricles appeared to have concentric hypertrophy with multiple, prominent myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the main ventricular cavity (Fig.