concentric contraction


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contraction

 [kon-trak´shun]
a drawing together; a shortening or shrinkage.
Braxton Hicks c's see braxton hicks contractions.
carpopedal contraction the condition resulting from chronic shortening of the muscles of the upper and lower limbs including the fingers and toes, seen in tetany.
concentric contraction contraction resulting in shortening of a muscle, used to perform positive work or to accelerate a body part. It is metabolically more demanding than an eccentric contraction. Called also shortening contraction.
Dupuytren's contraction Dupuytren's contracture.
eccentric contraction contraction in the presence of a resistive force that results in elongation of a muscle, used to perform negative work or to decelerate a body part. It is less metabolically demanding than a concentric contraction but may cause disruption of associated connective tissue with delayed soreness or frank injury if it occurs in an unaccustomed manner. Called also lengthening contraction.
end-diastolic premature ventricular contraction a ventricular ectopic beat falling at the end of diastole; it may or may not be slightly premature and may or may not be a fusion beat.
haustral c's muscular contractions of the wall of the large intestine during which the haustra can be seen more easily; called also haustrations.
isometric contraction muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isotonic contraction muscle contraction without appreciable change in the force of contraction; the distance between the origin and insertion becomes lessened.
lengthening contraction eccentric contraction.
postural contraction the state of muscular tension and contraction that just suffices to maintain the posture of the body.
segmental c's muscular contractions of the small intestine that serve to mix and transport chyme.
shortening contraction concentric contraction.
contraction stress test observation of the fetal heart rate in response to uterine contractions; see also fetal monitoring.
tetanic contraction (tonic contraction) physiological tetanus.
Volkmann's contraction Volkmann's contracture.

concentric contraction

muscular contraction producing movement as the result of shortening or decreasing the length of the muscle.

concentric contraction

Sports medicine Muscle contraction that occurs while the muscle is shortening as it develops tension and contracts to move a resistance. Cf Eccentric contraction.

con·cen·tric con·trac·tion

(kŏn-sen'trik kŏn-trak'shŭn)
A shortening action in which a muscle's attachments are drawn toward one another as the muscle contracts and overcomes an external resistance.
See also: eccentric contraction

con·cen·tric con·trac·tion

(kŏn-sen'trik kŏn-trak'shŭn)
Muscular contraction producing movement as the result of shortening or decreasing the length of the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Predominantly concentric contractions (running uphill), seem to be the most efficient way of increasing the HSP70 concentrations in the different tissues, followed by eccentric contraction (downhill) and lastly the concentric-eccentric cycle (horizontal).
Additionally, the average EMG values of the VL in response to the prolonged vibration stimulation were also significantly reduced in eccentric contraction over concentric contraction. Assuming that the application of prolonged vibration to muscles was considered to attenuate Ia afferents and the same protocol of vibration stimulation was applied in both condition of eccentric and concentric actions, the result suggested that the attenuation of Ia afferents had a greater deactivation effect on the alpha motor neuron of the VL during eccentric action than during concentric action.
The low values of sEMG amplitude observed for the beginning of concentric contractions, independent of the dumbbell curl protocol, may be explained by the reduced load moment arm and/or the right shift of muscle length value with respect to the muscle tension-length relationship (Falk and Tenenbaum, 1996).
All groups were subjected to the induced muscle fatigue protocol for the elbow flexor group, which consisted of 30 maximal concentric contractions at an angular velocity of 120[degrees]*[sec.sup.-1].
HTS seems to take advantage of both resistance exercise (anaerobic exercise) by electrical eccentric contractions and aerobic exercise at a low exercise intensity by voluntary concentric contractions. Therefore, HTS may improve not only muscle strength but also physical ability (aerobic power).
The extent of muscle hypertrophy is dependent upon protein degradation and synthesis, which may be enhanced through high intensity, high volume eccentric and concentric contractions.
Concentric contractions require the greatest energy expenditure, followed by isometric and eccentric contractions.
We previously examined the effect of the lengthening of a high intensity isokinetic fatigue protocol (20 to 50 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions at an angular velocity of 180[degrees] x [s.sup.-1]) on the relative and absolute reliability of fatigue measures (Bosquet et al., 2010).
Since RT promotes muscle strain that is essential to the adaptation and growth of skeletal muscle (22), knowing the different adaptations that occur during concentric contractions (CC) and eccentric contractions (EC) is important in prescribing a safe and beneficial RT program.
Isometric contractions (the hold phase) and concentric contractions (the contract phase) used immediately before the passive stretch (the relax phase) facilitate autogenic inhibition.
Motor output is more variable during eccentric compared with concentric contractions. Med Sci Sports Exerc 34:1773-1778, 2002.
* Examination of muscle activation patterns showed no significant difference between explosive isometric and fast ballistic concentric contractions. It may thus be hypothesized that the conscious effort to produce fast, explosive contractions may be a major stimulus in the development of muscular power.