conceive

(redirected from conceivability)
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conceive

 [kon-sēv´]
1. to become pregnant.
2. take in, grasp, or form in the mind.

conceive

(kon-sēv),
To become pregnant, i.e., to achieve implantation of the blastocyst, ideally in the endometrium.

conceive

/con·ceive/ (kon-sēv´)
1. to become pregnant.
2. take in, grasp, or form in the mind.

conceive

(kən-sēv′)
v.
1. To become pregnant.
2. To apprehend mentally; understand.

conceive

[kənsēv′]
Etymology: L, concipere, to take together
to become pregnant.

conceive

to become pregnant.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is, in a shell, Jackson's (1998) and Chalmers' (2004) view that epistemic possibility, couched in terms of conceivability, finally explains metaphysical possibility.
holdings in Iqbal and Twombly, the governing pleading standard in Delaware to survive a motion to dismiss is reasonable conceivability.
This article surveys the invention of liberal dialogue's difference against the background of McGrane's and Said's theses on the conceivability of 'cultural difference'.
Of course the possibility of success goes hand-in-hand with the conceivability of failure.
The stark conceivability of the "other" as less-than-human is raised--and encased in sacred memory--to be reviewed daily as holy obligation.
The argument for the defense of property dualism, a version of the conceivability argument, goes like this.
Whatever one thinks of the empirical applicability of the notion of genetic drift, it is certainly a notion that requires for its very conceivability a statistical and probabilistic framework.
The Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs collected sixty thousand signatures, calling on the government to endorse these measures because "the conceivability of genocide against minority groups, here in our own country, particularly against the Black people can not be wholly discounted.
The principal Dualist weapon is the conceivability argument.
Conti's central assumption is that, despite a change in emphasis, there was absolute continuity in Farrer's theological method: he sought to demonstrate the conceivability of theism by uncovering the metaphysical presuppositions of being.
Thus, Garber has shown the conceivability of selected failures of logical omniscience as well as the potential for logical facts to provide Bayesian confirmation for other propositions.
By systematically addressing them, the Logic of Conceivability (LoC) project will yield a paradigm shift in our understanding of the logic of human imagination.