computer science

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computer science

1. The development, configuration, and architecture of computer hardware and software.
2. The study of computer hardware and software.
See also: science
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References in periodicals archive ?
Babai claims that he has developed an algorithm that evaluates even the trickiest graphs in what's called quasipolynomial time, which computer scientists consider reasonable.
Communications engineering; essentials for computer scientists and electrical engineers.
Jain, a computer scientist at Michigan State University in East Lansing.
To test this sound theory, paleontologist Philip Currie of the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada, and computer scientist Nathan Myhrvold (right) of the Microsoft Corporation created computer simulations of dino tails, The simulations would tell them if it was possible for a dino tail to travel faster than sound.
"The problem is that the computer doesn't interpret "00" as the year 2000 but rather 1900, and miscalculates all computations accordingly," explains Gary Fisher, a computer scientist with National Institute of Standards and Technology, a division of the U.S.
But nearly every computer scientist will have a different prediction for when and how the singularity will happen.
"Five to 10 years ago, computer scientists weren't paying attention" to the technology used in voting, notes computer scientist David A.
He's a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh.
Into the Future shows us why we need to be concerned through insights from such prominent information professionals as Tim Berners-Lee, father of the World Wide Web; Peter Norton, founder of Norton Utilities; John Seely Brown, chief scientist at Xerox Corp.; Michael Dertouzos, director of MIT Laboratory for Computer Science; Jeff Rothenberg, senior computer scientist for RAND Corporation; and Deanna Marcum, president of the Council on Library and Information Resources.
Beyond school, whether a computer scientist is employed in academia or industry, an interest in social implications of computing must be satisfied outside of working hours, after one's real work is done, if it is to be satisfied at all.
"Our goal was to find out whether Twitter posts could be a useful source of public health information and we determined that indeed they could," Fox News quoted computer scientist Mark Drezd as saying.

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