microprocessor

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microprocessor

The pivotal hardware of a personal computer which contains the central arithmetic unit, a logic board and integrated circuitry that has been reduced in size to fit on silicon.
References in periodicals archive ?
This acceleration in technological innovation in semiconductors, therefore, resulted in acceleration in computer price declines; and if productivity gains in user industries are associated with rapid technological change, may be an important factor in our recent productivity bonanza.
Thus, rising real personal incomes and increasing business use of computers propel the computer demand curve outward, and declining computer prices driven by the outward shift in supply stimulates higher purchases as we slide down the relatively flat demand curve.
But, the large gains of the past few years may well turn out to be a transitory response to unusually rapid declines in computer prices and an unusually robust economic environment.
Computer prices have averaged a double-digit rate of decline since 1990.
Falling computer prices are expected to bring even more people online.
Given that consumers have benefited from constantly falling computer prices, the worst policy prescription is to reduce competition and keep prices paid by consumers and taxpayers alike artificially high.
Computer prices fell more rapidly in 1997 than in previous years, helped by sharp reductions in prices of central processing units.
With the continued growth of the business world and continued improvement in the people's per capita income, the computer market in Indonesia still has good opportunities for rapid growth, more so because computer prices have continued to decline with the rapid progress in the information technology and with the increasingly tight market competition.
Computer prices drop 30 percent annually and performance rates double every 18 months, according to Business Week magazine.
Errors can also occur when shelf tags and sale signs are not changed to correspond to the new computer prices.
Chow [1967] first applied this methodology to computer prices in research conducted at IBM.

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