compulsory admission

(redirected from compulsory detention)

compulsory admission

A mandated admission of a patient in the UK to hospital after a formal mental health assessment under the UK’s Mental Health Act 1983, 2007, which is carried out by an Approved Mental Health Worker (formerly by an Approved Social Worker) in conjunction with a Section 12(2)-approved doctor and a consultant psychiatrist. Under the Act, the person must have a mental disorder or disability of mind (alcohol or drug addiction alone are insufficient to detain a person under the Act), require hospital detention for assessment or treatment, and the detention must be necessary in the interests of the patient's health or safety, or with a view to the protection of others.

Compulsory admissions under Mental Health Act
Section 2: Admission for assessment—for up to 28 days; not renewable.
Section 3: Admission for treatment—for up to 6 months, renewable for another 6 months.
Section 4: Admission for emergency treatment—for up to 72 hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
A person suffering from a mental disorder during the period of their compulsory detention in a mental health care unit, in accordance with the provisions of Psychiatric Care Law No.
Involuntary treatment and compulsory detention of drug dependents
Human Rights Watch called on government to promote an "evidence-based and health-focused approach to people who use drugs, including voluntary treatment and harm reduction services, instead of compulsory detention.
The UN envoy enumerates cases of violations practiced by the militias, including targeting the civilian activists, which has been witnessed a remarkable increase regarding the number of reports on about rebuke and compulsory detention of journalists.
The awareness of being deemed to require compulsory detention generates such negative attitudes as self-denigration, fear and unhealthy repression of anger.
The Mental Health Act in 1985 by the late president Shaikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan ensures treatment of mental disorders which may include compulsory detention, and with the help of the police, inside specialised facilities.
As he is a suicide risk, the Bristol businessman is now subject to a further six months' compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act, it was said.
In a press conference preceding the debate, Sidibe marked the current situation with numbers: In the Asia Pacific region 90 percent of countries still have laws which obstruct the rights of people living with HIV and populations at higher risk of HIV exposure; 19 countries criminalize same-sex relations; 29 countries criminalize some aspect of sex work, 16 countries impose travel restrictions on people living with HIV and many countries enforce compulsory detention for people who use drugs, with 11 countries in Asia issuing the death penalty for drug offences.
The panel concluded: "The clinical forensic psychiatrist was not able to further consider instituting procedures leading to compulsory detention.
The next section examines sociological, ethical, and jurisprudential issues related to compulsory detention.
It does sweep up huge additional numbers of people under compulsory detention.
But the inquiry concluded the behaviour was not serious enough to merit compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act.

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