compulsion


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compulsion

 [kom-pul´shun]
1. a recurrent, unwanted, and distressing (ego-dystonic) urge to perform an act.
2. a compulsive act or ritual; a repetitive and stereotyped action that is performed to ward off some untoward event, although the patient recognizes that it does not do so in any realistic way. It serves as a defensive substitute for unacceptable unconscious ideas or impulses. Failure to perform the compulsive act gives rise to anxiety and tension. Common compulsions involve hand-washing, touching, counting, and checking. adj., adj compul´sive. See also obsessive-compulsive.
repetition compulsion in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences.

com·pul·sion

(kom-pŭl'shŭn),
Uncontrollable thoughts or impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires that, by themselves, arouse anxiety; the anxiety becomes fully manifest if performance of the compulsive act is prevented; may be associated with obsessive thoughts.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion

/com·pul·sion/ (kom-pul´shun)
1. an overwhelming urge to perform an irrational act or ritual.
2. the repetitive or stereotyped action that is the object of such an urge.compul´sive

repetition compulsion  in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences or traumatic behavior.

compulsion

(kəm-pŭl′shən)
n.
An uncontrollable impulse to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires which arouse anxiety.

compulsion

Etymology: L, compellere, to urge
an irresistible, repetitive irrational impulse to perform an act that is usually contrary to one's ordinary judgments or standards, yet results in overt anxiety if it is not completed. The compulsion also acts to decrease anxiety. The impulse is usually the result of an obsession. Compulsions are characteristic of an obsessive-compulsive disorder. Compare phobia. See also compulsive ritual, obsession, obsessive-compulsive disorder.

compulsion

Psychiatry A behavior or mental act which is repetitive–eg, handwashing, double-checking, or mental–eg, repeating words silently, which a person feels compelled to perform in response to an obsession, or according to rules that must be applied strictly or behaviors or mental acts aimed at preventing or ↓ distress or preventing some dreaded event or situation, which are not realistically connected with what they are intended to neutralize or prevent, or behaviors that are clearly excessive. See Repetition compulsion. Cf Obsession, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

com·pul·sion

(kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
Uncontrollable impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires which, by themselves, arouse anxiety; the anxiety becomes fully manifest if performance of the compulsive act is prevented; may be associated with obsessive thoughts.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion

1 An irresistible, or near-irresistible, impulse to perform an action, even if irrational or against the interests of the actor.
2 An act performed in response to such an impulse. See also COMPULSIVE BEHAVIOUR.

Compulsion

A repetitive or ritualistic behavior that a person performs to reduce anxiety. Compulsions often develop as a way of controlling or "undoing" obsessive thoughts.

com·pul·sion

(kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
Uncontrollable thoughts or impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires that, by themselves, arouse anxiety.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion (kəmpul´shən),

n a repetitive, stereotyped, and often trivial motor action, the performance of which is compelled even though the person does not wish to perform the act. Oral habits such as bruxism and clenching may become compulsions.

Patient discussion about compulsion

Q. Relation between bipolar & obsessive compulsive disorder. Is there any relation between bipolar and obsessive compulsive disorder? I ask you this because I have many answers so I have to choose one. Sorry I can’t post all which I know. Excuse me!

A. i know there is a condition called Bipolar OCD... so i don't understand the question if there's any connection... and as F3_4u mentioned - it is a common believe that OCD is a problem in serotonin secretion, the neurotransmitter that activate the "reward" feeling and stops the "seeking" system in our brain. and one of the genes that is connected to Bipolar disorder is also the serotonin gene. so there is a connection.

Q. What Is OCD? I have heard the term OCD on T.V and wanted to find out- what exactly is this syndrome?

A. OCD is a psychiatric disorder in which a person experiences obesessive thoughts and compulsions to do a ritual in order to "calm" these thoughts down. Obsessions can be recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced at some time during the disturbance. They are inappropriate and cause marked anxiety. Compulsions are defined by repetitive behaviors or mental acts that the person feels driven to perform in response to an obsession, or according to rules that must be applied rigidly. This disorder should be diagnosed only by a doctor.

More discussions about compulsion
References in periodicals archive ?
net/articles/2018-01-19-jolly-dystopian-survival-game-we-happy-few-delays-full-launch-early-access-to-be-suspended) Eurogamer has also learned directly from Compulsion that it is refunding players.
Compulsions can also be mental rituals, such as repeating words or phrases, or saying a prayer.
Yet Esolen rightly emphasizes that compulsion from within is much more insidious.
For the outcomes of BMI, moderate and vigorous physical activity, exercise compulsion, body dissatisfaction, and weight concern, gender-specific linear regression models were built to examine associations between exercise identity and exercise compulsion and these outcomes.
severidad y trastorno, en lugar de severidad de la obsesion y severidad de la compulsion), lo usual es que la CY-BOCS y la Y-BOCS se sigan considerando constituidas por tres escalas: severidad de la obsesion, severidad de la compulsion y puntuacion total (Storch et al.
But the more I thought about it, the more I wondered if Compulsion also seeks a younger audience, an audience less stuck in a particular way of thinking about these subjects.
3 : an act or the state of forcing an action <They got what they wanted through compulsion.
Unemployment insurance benefits and benefit sanctions do not have any treatment effects but their effects on behaviour show to what extent compulsion effects affect the labour market.
The fundamental problem is not compulsion to virtue, because Parens thinks that Plato, Aristotle, and al-Farabi see compulsion as punishment of the wicked: that is, only the wicked need compulsion, and those who are not vicious (or perhaps not incontinent) can be persuaded.
The IoD has set out proposals for minimal compulsion but the Government seeks to go much further and risks destabilising the pension system as a result.
Albino Barrera argues that pecuniary externalities at times cause economic compulsion (though not coercion) and that if such compulsion is serious enough in the lives of some, the rest of us have an obligation to assist.
The author brilliantly shows that compulsion needs not result only from intentional coercion, but often follows unintentionally from pecuniary externalities generated by the market itself.