compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
This issue is linked to a more substantial one: taking for granted that a certain decision should be a compromise, when does it become integrity compromising? To answer this question I shall use some notions suggested by Amartya Sen.
Dorothea recognises her love for Ladislaw and the sexual side of her nature when she comes unexpectedly upon Rosamond and Ladislaw and finds them in a seemingly compromising position.
For each such alternative, the counselor and the client need to examine the validity of the information about the critical aspect (i.e., the aspect that was the only reason for eliminating the alternative) and consider the possibility of compromising in that aspect (i.e., increasing the range of acceptable levels).
The definition of independence does not require the auditor to be completely free of all the factors that affect the ability to make unbiased audit decisions, but only free from those that rise to the level of compromising that ability.
The LTCM incident merits study to ensure that the lessons it provides are sufficiently understood and that constructive action is taken to effectively reduce the potential for similar events in the future, without compromising the efficiency of global capital markets.
Compromising the classics is Looney's term for what the three Ferrarese poets, Boiardo, Ariosto and Tasso did as they shaped the hybrid genre of epic-romance to the tastes of their day.
In the rapidly changing world of the early American republic, even doing nothing promised tangible results, and by the 1830s people's confidence in the good intentions of compromising leaders started to erode.
The problem is, as can be seen, that there is no majority agreement about who should do the compromising. Less than one-third of Americans believe that both sides should comprise, leaving a majority who say that either Bush or the Democratic leaders should compromise, but not the other.
Under the final regulation, compromise is permitted when there is no doubt as to liability or collectibility, and compromise would promote effective tax administration because (1) collection of the liability would create economic hardship or (2) compelling public policy or equitable considerations would provide a sufficient basis for compromising the liability.
Doe has no assets, but his earning capacity may enable him to accumulate $2,000 each year after "necessary expenses." Under prior policy, no basis for compromising Doe's liability was available to the IRS because the assessed amount was collectible over time through an installment, direct debit or payroll deduction agreement.