compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.
References in classic literature ?
A belief in his capacity had taken such deep root in all minds that the more ambitious public men felt it was necessary to compromise des Lupeaulx in some way to prevent his rising higher; they made up to him for his subordinate public position by their secret confidence.
No Brown compromise to-night," said East, looking at his watch.
There would then be no necessity for management or compromise, in relation to any other point -- no giving nor taking.
Here are steps that result in making good compromises.
The research found that the price paid (26%), the decor (23%), the size of the rooms (20%) and the garden (17%) were also factors people had often made compromises on when buying their home.
One in seven (13%) had made compromises on the structure of the property when they bought their home - and three in 10 (30%) regretted it.
Colin Powell, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and secretary of state, said, "Just as they did in Philadelphia when they were writing the Constitution, sooner or later, you've got to compromise. You've got to start making the compromises that arrive at a consensus and move the country forward."
Email compromises accounted for 23 percent of incidents reported to the Beazley Breach Response (BBR) Services team during the second quarter of 2018.
To illustrate: In a (http://www.people-press.org/2014/06/12/political-compromise-in-principle/) 2014 Pew survey , 64 percent of Democrats and 49 percent of Republicans agreed with the statement, "I like elected officials who "make compromises with people they disagree with" rather than elected officials who "stick to their positions."
But all politicians have to make compromises, and so do voters.
Mortgage Advisers asked people who had bought a house in the past five years whether they had made any compromises on the property they had bought.
Lrayedh denied revocation of concluded compromises.