compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roles such as leader, harmonizer, listener, compromiser, encourager, facilitator, guider, and organizer emerged spontaneously and characterized all of the participants (the electronics students, the engineer-tutor, and the teacher-researchers) throughout the research.
For instance, sometimes a party to a compromise renounces its legitimate concerns just to advance its goals, so that the compromiser feels her interests are better served by an agreement than by enforcing her rights.
Open, frank r discussion about compromiser agreg ements is essential.
For example, White noted, "if you know you're a compromiser, in order to improve, you have to hold out and stay at the table a little bit longer and be more of a problem solver." While these two options might sound similar, a compromiser is a bit more eager to wrap up the negotiation and more prone to giving up things that might not need to be conceded, while a problem solver focuses more on finding a route toward both parties getting what they want.
Compromiser style leader is a poor decision maker who is over influenced by the pressures of work, who minimizes immediate pressures and problems.
If it's history you want, Henry Clay, “The Great Compromiser,” is interred here.
I am status" usually city in the true, sense and its wanted it In Wrexham, were bothered rightly, it If a liberal compromiser like Dr Williams cannot unite the church on issues like gay clergy and women bishops, it begs the question why bother trying?
In daily life we may use all of the interaction styles (avoider, accommodater, competer, compromiser, and collaborator), depending on the situation.
I am not certain that the Great Compromiser Henry Clay would be able to forge an alliance between the touch-and-drag faction and the old-school desktop interface with its myriad options.
None of those parties is called the Wishy-Washy Compromiser Party.
Everyone is expected to give up something and the compromiser him- or herself also expects to relinquish something.
President Barak Obama is a great compromiser. For him, barter is so essential that he's willing to sacrifice his integrity for compromise.