compress

(redirected from compressive)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

compress

 [kom´pres]
a pad of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.

com·press

(kom'pres),
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

/com·press/ (kom´pres) a pad or bolster of folded linen or other material, applied with pressure; sometimes medicated, it may be wet or dry, or hot or cold.

compress

(kəm-prĕs′)
tr.v. com·pressed, com·pressing, com·presses
1. To press together: compressed her lips.
2. To make more compact by or as if by pressing.
n. (kŏm′prĕs′)
Medicine A soft pad of gauze or other material applied with pressure to a part of the body to control hemorrhage or to supply heat, cold, moisture, or medication to alleviate pain or reduce infection.

com·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
com·press′i·ble (kəm-prĕs′ə-bəl) adj.

compress

[kom′pres]
Etymology: L, comprimere, to press together
a soft pad, usually made of cloth, used to apply heat, cold, or medication to the surface of a body area. A compress also may be applied over a wound to help control bleeding. Compare dressing.

compress

noun A pad of folded gauze that may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time—e.g., to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; they can be cold or hot, moist or dry.

verb To apply pressure.

compress

A pad of folded gauze, which may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time–eg, to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; compresses can be cold or hot; moist or dry. See Cold compress, Hot compress.

com·press

(kom'pres)
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

A pad of gauze or other material firmly applied to a part of the body to apply heat, cold or medication or to control bleeding (haemorrhage).

compress,

n a method of medicine preparation in which a large cloth is soaked in a hot infusion or decoction; the excess liquid wrung out; and the cloth applied to the affected part of the body.
compress, cold,
n a cloth or pad soaked in cold water or ice (sometimes containing herbs or specific solutes) and applied on a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used as a single compress to reduce blood flow and as a double compress to increase blood flow.
compress, hot,
n a cloth or pad moistened in warm to hot water and applied to a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used to ease pain locally, increase blood flow, and relax muscles.

compress

a square of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
These specimens were placed in different curing conditions for required age days to analyse the effect of curing on compressive strength.
As shown in the figure, when the compressive strain increases, the graphite nodules are flattened and elongated in the transverse direction.
Therefore compressive strength properties values should only compiled based on the timber failed in three modes of failure only.
KEY WORDS: Bulk fill, Compressive strength, Dual cure, Zirconia nano particle, Photoactivation duration.
The variation of the unconfined compressive strength with the percent of carbide waste is shown in Figures 4a and b.
Two types of silica rice husks were used; one was used directly and the other was used after 30 hours of milling to determine the effect of size on compressive strength.
With the values of the compressive strength of each one of the three mixes, four parameters are correlated: compressive strength at j days of age (fcj); water/cement ratio (w/c); dry aggregate/cement ratio, given by weight in kg [kg.
There exists a strong exponential relationship between Schmidt rebound number and unconned compressive strength of limestone rocks from Malaysia with high degree of accuracy.
Figure 1 shows the ultimate compressive strength of hybrid GGBS-HCWA geopolymer mortar mixes for 2 different ages namely 7and 28 days.
In foundry, modified corn starch was used as a main binder for sand core to improve bonding property in application to iron sand casting due to its suitable viscosity, good hygroscopicity resistance, higher specific bonding strength, compressive strength, and tensile strength compared to furane resin bonded sand [5].
The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate high strain rate behavior of alumina nanoparticle filled epoxy resin using compressive SHPB apparatus.