compress

(redirected from compressive)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

compress

 [kom´pres]
a pad of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·press

(kom'pres),
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

compress

(kəm-prĕs′)
tr.v. com·pressed, com·pressing, com·presses
1. To press together: compressed her lips.
2. To make more compact by or as if by pressing.
n. (kŏm′prĕs′)
Medicine A soft pad of gauze or other material applied with pressure to a part of the body to control hemorrhage or to supply heat, cold, moisture, or medication to alleviate pain or reduce infection.

com·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
com·press′i·ble (kəm-prĕs′ə-bəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

compress

noun A pad of folded gauze that may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time—e.g., to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; they can be cold or hot, moist or dry.

verb To apply pressure.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

compress

A pad of folded gauze, which may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time–eg, to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; compresses can be cold or hot; moist or dry. See Cold compress, Hot compress.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·press

(kom'pres)
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

compress

A pad of gauze or other material firmly applied to a part of the body to apply heat, cold or medication or to control bleeding (haemorrhage).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoek-Brown Parameters especially the value of mi is determined by fitting Hoek-Brown failure criterion to full sale laboratory data including uniaxial tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength and triaxial compressive tests results.
This fiber addition tends to increase the concrete tensile strength, while maintaining its compressive strength.
The original Gibson-Ashby model [1] predicts that the compressive behavior of a well-expanded foam essentially depends only on the relative density.
The mean and coefficient of variation (CV) for compressive strength of the clear samples are presented in Table 1.
The angle [theta] of the compressive strut for the walls tested in this investigation is [theta] = 47[degrees].
The compressive strength test was carried out on GPC specimens at ages of 7 and 28 days.
Figure 4 shows the correlation between the compressive strength and the content of recycled aggregate (R and S) for recycled concrete with two water to cement ratios of 0.47 and 0.53.
Slightly different from the concrete with a quality of 20 MPa, the compressive strength of the concrete with a quality of 30 MPa increased slightly when 0.21% calcium stearate by weight of cement was added.
As we can see from Figure 1, regardless of the amount of active magnesia tested, the strength of the blocks is significantly higher than the compressive strength of the active magnesia block.
In this research work, an attempt was made to analyse the effect of curing on compressive strength of concrete.