compression

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compression

 [kom-presh´un]
1. the act of pressing upon or together; the state of being pressed together.
2. in embryology, the shortening or omission of certain developmental stages.
3. the flattening of soft tissue to improve optical density in radiographic procedures such as mammography.

com·pres·sion

(kom-presh'ŭn),
A squeezing together; the exertion of pressure on a body in such a way as to tend to increase its density; the decrease in a dimension of a body under the action of two external forces directed toward one another in the same straight line.

compression

Clinical medicine Squeezing; pressure on a body or vital structure by 2 or more external forces, where the force is exerted by the bodies in a linear direction toward each other Telemedicine A process used to transmit graphic images by eliminating extraneous data and packaging the file into lean block of data that is de-compressed by the receiver Types Lossless, lossy. See Lossless compression, Lossy compression.

com·pres·sion

(kŏm-presh'ŭn)
A squeezing together; the exertion of pressure on a body to tend to increase its density; the decrease in a dimension of a body under the action of two external forces directed toward one another.

Compression

An increase in pressure from the surrounding water that occurs with increasing diving depth.

com·pres·sion

(kŏm-presh'ŭn)
A squeezing together; the exertion of pressure on a body in such a way as to tend to increase its density.
References in periodicals archive ?
From images obtained multiple compressions in table 5, it can be concluded that single compression is better as compared to further compressions.
Participants in the control arm were instructed to perform the AHA ACLS single-rescuer resuscitation comprised cycles of 30 chest compressions to 2 ventilations.
Under these hypotheses, we performed a simulation study of the management of OHCA occurring in a high-rise building to examine the effects of mechanical compressions and supraglottic airway use on the quality of CPR, focusing on flow time using time-motion analysis.
The quality of CPR depends on the accuracy of its two main components, namely, chest compressions and ventilation.
"Evidence shows that every time you stop compressions, you decrease the chance of survival," says Elisa Mazzaferro, DVM, Ph.D., a board-certified emergency and critical care specialist at Cornell University Veterinary Specialists in Stamford, Conn.
"Evidence shows that every time you stop compressions, you decrease the chance of survival," says Elisa Mazzaferro, DVM, Ph.D., who is board certified in emergency and critical care at Cornell University's Veterinary Specialists Clinic in Stamford, Conn.
Since TCP is unaware of the characteristics of the application data, it would perform futile compressions on the data such as audio and video data, which probably has been encoded deliberately with less redundant information.
"This approach was causing significant delays in starting chest compressions, which are essential for keeping oxygen-rich blood circulating through the body.
Chest compression fraction determines survival in patients with out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation.
The two studies' investigators used a new monitor/defibrillator device that can count how often compressions are given and how much pressure is exerted with each compression.
Becker said that he and his colleagues have performed another study, of 100 patients, in which the compression rate was counted and recorded by a trained nurse at the scene.
Splice Standard Barrel Copper Compression Connector For