compartment syndrome

(redirected from compression syndrome)
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com·part·ment syn·drome

a condition in which increased pressure in a confined anatomic space adversely affects the circulation and threatens the function and viability of the structures therein.

compartment syndrome

(kəm-pärt′mənt)
n.
A condition characterized by increased pressure within a confined space, such as a muscle compartment, resulting in reduced blood flow, pain, and, if untreated, necrosis and functional impairment.
A symptom complex caused by ischaemia, trauma—fractures, inflammation—or infection of a closed anatomic space, resulting in compression of nerves, blood vessels, or tendons that traverse the space
Management Early therapy—fasciotomy is crucial as end-stage disease requires major reconstructive surgery to salvage function

compartment syndrome

Compressive syndrome Orthopedics A symptom complex caused by ischemia, trauma–fractures, inflammation or infection of a closed anatomic space, resulting in compression of nerves, blood vessels, or tendons that traverse the space Clinical Numbness, paresthesias, pain or loss of movement of an extremity Management Early therapy–fasciotomy is crucial as end-stage disease requires major reconstructive surgery to salvage function. See Carpal tunnel syndrome, Tarsal tunnel syndrome.

com·part·ment syn·drome

(kŏm-pahrt'mĕnt sin'drōm)
Condition in which increased intramuscular pressure in a confined anatomic space, brought on by overactivity or trauma, impedes blood flow and function of tissues within that space.
Synonym(s): compression syndrome (2) .

compartment syndrome

The effects of tissue swelling within a compartment of the body, usually the forearm or the lower leg. There is compression of the blood vessels and resulting muscle atrophy. Operation to open up the tissue planes and relieve the pressure may be urgently needed.

Compartment syndrome

Compartment syndrome is a condition in which a muscle swells but is constricted by the connective tissue around it, which cuts off blood supply to the muscle.
Mentioned in: Fractures

com·part·ment syn·drome

(kŏm-pahrt'mĕnt sin'drōm)
Condition in which increased pressure in a confined anatomic space adversely affects circulation and threatens function and viability of structures therein.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the initial approach of a young man who presents with spinal cord compression syndrome, the presence of MSCCS associated with GCT should be considered as a possible cause.
Iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), also known as May–Thurner syndrome or Cockett syndrome, is characterized by left common iliac vein (LCIV) compression by the right iliac artery (RIA) and the fifth lumbar vertebra.
Caption: FIGURE 1: Thickened median arcuate ligament (MAL) and typical celiac axis narrowing with a hooked appearance pointed towards compression syndrome (arrow).
Venous compression syndromes: clinical features, imaging findings and management.
A barium upper gastrointestinal study was ordered to confirm superior mesenteric artery compression syndrome as suggested by the CT findings.
Handlebar palsy--a compression syndrome of the deep terminal (motor) branch of the ulnar nerve in biking.
[Lipoma as a rare cause of nerve compression syndrome in the hand and forearm].
Tye proposed that the lower left side predominance of the DVTs might be related to May-Thurner Syndrome, also called iliac vein compression syndrome. Named after the two physicians who first described it more than 50 years ago (Angiology 1957;8:419-27), the syndrome describes the small diameter of the left common iliac vein as typically resulting from compression by the right common iliac artery.