compression strength


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Related to compression strength: Shear strength, crushing strength

compression strength

The point at which a material loses its shape when force is applied. Also called crushing strength.
See also: strength
References in periodicals archive ?
Foam density was tested as described by ASTM D1622M2014 standard, and the compression strength at 10% strain in the direction parallel to foam growth was measured with UTM4204 instrument following the ASTM D 1621-94 standard.
The pressure was applied equally to approximately 2 to 3 N [mm.sup.-2] for diagonal compression strength measurements.
Table 4 lists the uniaxial compression strength and elastic modulus of andesite subject to different freeze-thaw cycles.
In which [f.sub.ck] is the compression strength, in megapascals; Eci is the initial modulus of elasticity, in megapascals; and Ecs is the secant modulus of elasticity, in megapascals.
In terms of compression strength values, for structural size specimens, Resak gives the highest value of compressive strength, 57.6 MPa.
Figure 10: shows the effect of compacting pressure on compression strength. It can be noticed that when the pressure increases, the compression strength increasing.
Because the values of [C.sub.3], [C.sub.3], [C.sub.4], and [C.sub.6] are zero, stone properties with nonzero values, including quartz ([C.sub.2]), shore hardness ([C.sub.5]), bending strength ([C.sub.7]), and compression strength ([C.sub.8]), were chosen to rank the sawability, as listed in Table 9.
In the plastic stage, the damage degree and damage rate initially decrease and later increase with the increase in transverse scale, which is similar to the influence on uniaxial compression strength. In the failure stage, since rocks are instable and discrete, transverse effects do not obviously influence damage evolution properties of rocks.
Green pellet properties include compression strength, moisture content, falling strength, and shock temperature.
where [C.sub.1] = (1 + 0.6 tan [phi]) [[sigma].sub.c] and q = [tan.sup.2]([pi]/4 + [phi]/2); [phi] and [[sigma].sub.c] are internal friction angle and uniaxial compression strength, respectively.
Greencoat[R] double-wall boxes provide 15% increased top to bottom compression strength and higher resistance to bulge.
However, matrix stiffness is essential variable affecting composite compression strength due to the fact that fiber microbuckling, a major compression failure mechanism, depends on the amount of support provided by the matrix to the fibers.