compression fracture


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fracture

 [frak´chur]
1. the breaking of a part, especially a bone.
2. a break in continuity of bone; it may be caused by trauma, twisting due to muscle spasm or indirect loss of leverage, or by disease that results in osteopenia. See illustration.
Types of fractures.
Treatment. Immediate first aid consists of splinting the bone with no attempt to reduce the fracture; it should be splinted “as it lies,” which means supporting it in such a way that the injured part will remain steady and will resist jarring if the victim is moved. Later it will be treated by reduction, which means that the broken ends are pulled into alignment and the continuity of the bone is established so that healing can take place. Fracture healing is truly a process of regeneration. Fractures heal with normal bone, not with scar tissue. Closed reduction is performed by manual manipulation of the fractured bone so that the fragments are brought into proper alignment; no surgical incision is made. Open fractures are highly contaminated and must be débrided and copiously irrigated in the operating room. A fracture may also require internal fixation with pins, nails, metal plates, or screws to stabilize the alignment. Once closed reduction is accomplished, the bone is immobilized by application of a cast or by an apparatus exerting traction on the distal end of the bone.
avulsion fracture separation of a small fragment of bone cortex at the site of attachment of a ligament or tendon.
Barton's fracture fracture of the distal end of the radius into the wrist joint.
Bennett's fracture fracture of the base of the first metacarpal bone, running into the carpometacarpal joint, complicated by subluxation.
blow-out fracture fracture of the orbital floor caused by a sudden increase of intraorbital pressure due to traumatic force; the orbital contents herniate into the maxillary sinus so that the inferior rectus or inferior oblique muscle may become incarcerated in the fracture site, producing diplopia on looking up.
closed fracture one that does not produce an open wound, as opposed to an open fracture. See illustration. Called also simple fracture.
Colles' fracture fracture of the lower end of the radius, the distal fragment being displaced backward.
comminuted fracture one in which the bone is splintered or crushed, with three or more fragments. See illustration.
complete fracture one involving the entire cross section of the bone.
compound fracture open fracture.
compression fracture one produced by compression.
depressed fracture (depressed skull fracture) fracture of the skull in which a fragment is depressed.
direct fracture one at the site of injury.
dislocation fracture fracture of a bone near an articulation with concomitant dislocation of that joint.
double fracture fracture of a bone in two places.
Dupuytren's fracture Pott's fracture.
Duverney's fracture fracture of the ilium just below the anterior inferior spine.
fissure fracture a crack extending from a surface into, but not through, a long bone.
greenstick fracture one in which one side of a bone is broken and the other is bent, most commonly seen in children. See illustration.
impacted fracture fracture in which one fragment is firmly driven into the other.
incomplete fracture one that does not involve the complete cross section of the bone.
indirect fracture one distant from the site of injury.
interperiosteal fracture greenstick fracture.
intrauterine fracture fracture of a fetal bone incurred in utero.
Jefferson's fracture fracture of the atlas (first cervical vertebra).
lead pipe fracture one in which the bone cortex is slightly compressed and bulged on one side with a slight crack on the other side of the bone.
Le Fort fracture bilateral horizontal fracture of the maxilla. Le Fort fractures are classified as follows: Le Fort I fracture, a horizontal segmented fracture of the alveolar process of the maxilla, in which the teeth are usually contained in the detached portion of the bone. Le Fort II fracture, unilateral or bilateral fracture of the maxilla, in which the body of the maxilla is separated from the facial skeleton and the separated portion is pyramidal in shape; the fracture may extend through the body of the maxilla down the midline of the hard palate, through the floor of the orbit, and into the nasal cavity. Le Fort III fracture, a fracture in which the entire maxilla and one or more facial bones are completely separated from the craniofacial skeleton; such fractures are almost always accompanied by multiple fractures of the facial bones.
longitudinal fracture one extending along the length of the bone. See illustration.
Monteggia's fracture one in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.
oblique fracture one in which the break extends in an oblique direction. See illustration.
open fracture one in which a wound through the adjacent or overlying soft tissue communicates with the outside of the body; this must be considered a surgical emergency. The compounding may come from within (by a bone protruding through the skin) or from without (e.g., by a bullet wound communicating with the bone). See illustration. Called also compound fracture.
pathologic fracture one due to weakening of the bone structure by pathologic processes such as neoplasia or osteomalacia; see illustration. Called also spontaneous fracture.
pertrochanteric fracture fracture of the femur passing through the greater trochanter.
ping-pong fracture an indented fracture of the skull, resembling the indentation that can be produced with the finger in a ping-pong ball; when elevated it resumes and retains its normal position.
Pott's fracture fracture of lower part of the fibula with serious injury of the lower tibial articulation.
simple fracture closed fracture.
Smith's fracture reversed Colles' fracture.
spiral fracture one in which the bone has been twisted and the fracture line resembles a spiral. See illustration.
spontaneous fracture pathologic fracture.
sprain fracture the separation of a tendon from its insertion, taking with it a piece of bone.
stellate fracture one with a central point of injury, from which radiate numerous fissures.
Stieda's fracture a fracture of the internal condyle of the femur.
transcervical fracture one through the neck of the femur.
transverse fracture one at right angles to the axis of the bone. See illustration.
trophic fracture one due to a nutritional (trophic) disturbance.

compression fracture

a type of collapsing breakage, often involving the vertebrae, where it results from axial loading forces from top to bottom; evident radiographically by diminished height and squareness of bone; often painful and without neurologic impairment; may be seen after even minor trauma in association with osteoporosis.

compression fracture

n.
A fracture caused by the compression of one bone, especially a vertebra, against another.

compression fracture

Compression axial fracture, crush fracture Orthopedics
1. A lower cervical spine fracture caused by axial loading Clinical Ranges from minor–little displacement of bone, managed with external immobilization, to severe–bursting injury of the vertebral body and retropulsion of bone into the spinal canal or with significant comminution, best managed with cervical corpectomy and bone grafting.
2. A fracture of a vertebral body due to axial compression, with loss of height of the vertebral body on X-ray, common in the lumbar spine in postmenopausal ♀ with osteoporosis.

com·pres·sion frac·ture

(kŏm-presh'ŭn frak'shŭr)
Breakage causing loss of height of the vertebral body either by trauma or by pathology. It occurs most commonly in thoracic and lumbar spines. A common sequela of osteoporosis.
Synonym(s): burst fracture.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients are carefully placed in the prone position, and every attempt is made to bolster the patient so as to facilitate hyperextension at the level of the vertebral compression fracture. This maneuver has been reported to predispose to height restoration even with vertebroplasty.
Summary: This case report presents an argument that a tonic-clonic seizure, in the absence of external trauma or significant risk factors for fracture, resulted in multiple vertebral compression fractures.
This is because compression fractures occur depending on osteopenia developed in these patients at a rate of one-third.
Chen, "Balloon kyphoplasty versus percutaneous vertebroplasty in treating osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture: grading the evidence through a systematic review and meta-analysis," European Spine Journal, vol.
Excellent results can be achieved in compression fracture by conservative treatment.
And a history of osteoporosis or systemic corticosteroid use increases the likelihood of vertebral compression fracture, she continued.
Designed to treat spinal compression fractures, the Acu-Cut device is a uni-pedicular vertebral augmentation system designed to create a cavity for precise cement placement.
One mechanism is the injection of 'medical cement' directly into the compression fracture site.
Under what circumstances do you recommend vertebroplasty for a patient with an osteoporotic compression fracture?
The author has hypothesized that back exercises performed in a prone position, rather than in a vertical position, may have a greater effect on decreasing risk for vertebral fractures without resulting in compression fracture. One can theorize that the risk for vertebral fracture can be reduced through improvement in the horizontal trabecular connection of vertebral bodies (Fig 7) (20).
Over one million people worldwide have been diagnosed with at least one compression fracture, more than half of them in the United States.
On March 15, 2006, she underwent a CT scan that revealed "a compression fracture of T-7 and a compression deformity of T-11." Nevertheless, nursing home personnel did not hospitalize her and allegedly "failed to follow any spinal cord precautions to guard against spinal cord injury.