compound

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Related to compounds: Organic compounds, Chemical compounds

compound

 [kom´pownd]
1. made up of diverse elements or ingredients.
2. a substance made up of two or more materials.
3. in chemistry, a substance made up of two or more elements in union. The elements are united chemically, which means that each of the original elements loses its individual characteristics once it has combined with the other element(s). When elements combine they do so in definite proportions by weight; this is why the union of hydrogen and oxygen always produces water. Sugar, salt, and vinegar are examples of compounds.

Organic compounds are those containing carbon atoms; inorganic compounds are those that do not contain carbon atoms.
clathrate c's inclusion complexes in which molecules of one type are trapped within cavities of another substance, such as within a crystalline lattice structure or large molecule.
quaternary ammonium compound an organic compound containing a quaternary ammonium group, a nitrogen atom carrying a single positive charge bonded to four carbon atoms, e.g., choline.

com·pound

(kom'pownd),
1. chemistry a substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more atoms, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from any of its components.
2. pharmacy denoting a preparation containing several ingredients. For compounds not listed here, see the specific chemical or pharmaceutical names.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. compono]

compound

Chemistry
noun A substance made up of ≥ 2 elements.

Pharmacology
verb To combine two or more active pharmacologic agents into a single preparation, often referred to as a “dosage form”.

compound

Clinical pharmacology verb To combine two or more active pharmacologics to produce a single preparation, often referred to as a dosage form. See Formulation.

com·pound

(kom'pownd)
1. chemistry A substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more elements, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from any of its components.
2. pharmacy A preparation containing several ingredients.

compound

(of plant structures) made up of several similar parts, as in a leaf compound of several leaflets. A simple structure is one not divided into similar parts.

com·pound

(kom'pownd)
1. chemistry a substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more atoms, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from its components.
2. pharmacy denoting a preparation of several ingredients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Industry will probably be pleased to hear that it isn't responsible for the cleanup of additional compounds, he says, but the study "doesn't say that Monsanto, the main producer of PCBs, is not responsible for PCBs that are found in the environment."
Part of the medical school's strategy is to find new and novel compounds from natural sources.
Acquiring labels for compounds require expensive wet experiments in the case of drug screening, thus a lesser number of wet experiments is desirable.
Immediately after incubation, Epel and Luckenbach found rhodamine B uptake to be 38-84% higher in tissue treated with musk compounds than in controls.
"Although completely different structurally, there are some important similarities between these new compounds and Peplin's lead anti-cancer drug PEP005, in particular the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and evidence of powerful effects on the immune system.
Figure 2 is a graphical representation of the reduction of tensile strength of a coldbox core sand mixture (1% binder by weight) with varying levels of vein reduction compounds. Vein reduction materials are intended to be consumed at higher concentration levels in the prepared sand mixtures (2-10%) without a dramatic reduction in tensile properties of the cured sand mixture.
Gyro Plastic Mixers in several sizes mix liquid resin compounds of any viscosity in batches from one pint to 16 gal, and are reportedly highly effective for resin pastes.
This convertibility might make it possible to recover and reuse the compounds, according to the researchers' report.
With the exception of cantharidin, these compounds were also AhR agonists in stably transfected Hepa-1 cells, and compounds such as galangin, genistein, daidzein, apigenin, and diosmin that were active in Hepa-1 cells did not induce a response in MCF-7 cells.
Initial sampling of groundwater around the four landfills in the spring of 1986 indicated no compounds above the reported detection limit of 1 ppb.
However, during the initial high temperature testing of rubber compounds for static FEA, we discovered the trend of stress change was somehow contradictory to these results.
* Georgia Gulf Chemicals & Vinyls LLC, Compound Div., GA