compound

(redirected from compounded)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

compound

 [kom´pownd]
1. made up of diverse elements or ingredients.
2. a substance made up of two or more materials.
3. in chemistry, a substance made up of two or more elements in union. The elements are united chemically, which means that each of the original elements loses its individual characteristics once it has combined with the other element(s). When elements combine they do so in definite proportions by weight; this is why the union of hydrogen and oxygen always produces water. Sugar, salt, and vinegar are examples of compounds.

Organic compounds are those containing carbon atoms; inorganic compounds are those that do not contain carbon atoms.
clathrate c's inclusion complexes in which molecules of one type are trapped within cavities of another substance, such as within a crystalline lattice structure or large molecule.
quaternary ammonium compound an organic compound containing a quaternary ammonium group, a nitrogen atom carrying a single positive charge bonded to four carbon atoms, e.g., choline.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·pound

(kom'pownd),
1. chemistry a substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more atoms, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from any of its components.
2. pharmacy denoting a preparation containing several ingredients. For compounds not listed here, see the specific chemical or pharmaceutical names.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. compono]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

compound

Chemistry
noun A substance made up of ≥ 2 elements.

Pharmacology
verb To combine two or more active pharmacologic agents into a single preparation, often referred to as a “dosage form”.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

compound

Clinical pharmacology verb To combine two or more active pharmacologics to produce a single preparation, often referred to as a dosage form. See Formulation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·pound

(kom'pownd)
1. chemistry A substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more elements, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from any of its components.
2. pharmacy A preparation containing several ingredients.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

compound

(of plant structures) made up of several similar parts, as in a leaf compound of several leaflets. A simple structure is one not divided into similar parts.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

com·pound

(kom'pownd)
1. chemistry a substance formed by the covalent or electrostatic union of two or more atoms, generally differing entirely in physical characteristics from its components.
2. pharmacy denoting a preparation of several ingredients.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the biggest TPO compounders in North America, D & S Plastics International of Auburn Hills, Mich., has used reactor TPOs as a feedstock for compounded materials for a couple of years.
The flow range of Himont's reactor materials, from fractional-melt to 20 MFR, pretty much covers the same range as today's compounded TPOs.
Another problem with reactor TPOs is they shrink more than comparable compounded grades.
BASF AG has two PP plants in Germany that make reactor TPOs, and reactor TPOs are also made by DSM in the Netherlands, which just bought the Sarlink compounded TPO and PVC/nitrile TPE product lines from Novacor Chemicals and is talking to molders about possible reactor-TPO production here.
* Highly extended compounds: Since medium thermal black does not seriously degrade inherent rubber properties, it can often be compounded at considerably high loading levels.
When properly compounded, use of SFR-100 resin with around 5 phr magnesium stearate (MgSt) in a high- or low-density polyethylene or polypropylene matrix can perform according to the requirements described in UL Standard 94 as V-1.
However, when properly compounded with SFR-100 resin, the C-18 stearate chain seems to compatibilize the magnesium with the silicone.
However, when AMP is compounded with SFR-100 resin, its thermal stability is improved by an average of 30-50[degrees]F, allowing processors to take advantage of the salt's flame-retardant properties without sacrificing processability of the base polymer.
This system can process 2 tons/hr and can be used for any sort of direct shape extrusion of the compounded product.