compound odontoma


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Related to compound odontoma: ameloblastoma

com·pound o·don·to·ma

an odontoma in which the odontogenic tissues are organized and resemble anomalous teeth.

com·pound o·don·to·ma

(kompownd ōdon-tōmă)
An odontoma in which the odontogenic tissues are organized and resemble anomalous teeth.

com·pound o·don·to·ma

(kompownd ōdon-tōmă)
Odontoma in which the odontogenic tissues are organized and resemble anomalous teeth.
Synonym(s): composite odontoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any radio opacity occurring near to the midline will be mostly interpreted as a mesiodens but other possible diagnosis of complex, compound odontoma and any agglomerated mass must be taken into consideration.
Compound odontoma. Head and Neck Pathol 2010;4(4):290-1.
Compound odontoma causing impaction of mandibular canine: A case report.
The persistence of the lamina may be an important factor in the etiology of complex or compound odontomas, and either of these may occur instead of a tooth.
Compound odontomas are mainly located in the anterior maxilla and appear as a collection of tooth-like structures surrounded by a radiolucent zone (Figure 9), whereas complex odontomas radiographically are found most often in the posterior mandible and consist of a homogeneous mass of calcified tissue surrounded by a thin soft tissue capsule (Figure 10) (27, 28).
Histologically there are two types of odontomas; compound odontomas consist of all dental tissues resembling a tooth-like structure and complex odontomas are present as disorganized mass (2).
Compound odontomas often occur in the incisor and canine areas of the maxilla.
Histologically, the compound odontoma will often have normal appearing enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp.
[6] Here we present a remarkable symptomatic case of complex odontoma, which was radiographically similar to a compound odontoma.
Odontomas are of two types, the complex and the compound odontoma. (3) The distinction between complex and composite odontomas is arbitrary, being based on the preponderance of well-organized denticles as opposed to a preponderance of disorganised dental tissues rather than on any absolute difference.
(1,2,8) Compound odontomas are composed of several well-formed, tooth-like structures (Figure 3A), while complex odontomas show irregular, amorphous hyperattenuating, calcified tissue surrounded by a radiolucency (Figure 3B).