composite

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composite

 [kom-poz´it]
1. made up of unlike parts.

com·pos·ite

(kom-poz'-it),
A colloquial term for resin materials used in restorative dentistry.
[L. compositus, put together, fr. compono, to put together]

composite

/com·pos·ite/ (kom-poz´it)
1. made up of unlike parts.

com·pos·ite

(kŏm-poz'it)
A colloquial term for resin materials used in restorative dentistry.
[L. compositus, put together, fr. compono, to put together]

com·pos·ite

(kŏm-poz'it)
A colloquial term for resin materials used in restorative dentistry.
[L. compositus, put together, fr. compono, to put together]

composite,

n in dentistry, material made from mixture of resin and silica used in tooth-colored fillings and other restorative work. It was created as an alternative to metallic fillings, which were much more visible due to their dark coloring. Also known as a
resin matrix.
composite cement,
n a dental adhesive made of colloidal silica powder combined with the matrix monomer dimethacrylate.
composite odontoma,
composite resin,
composites, hybrid,
n.pl resins made from a combination of macrofill and microfill particles that are generally considered easy to polish and highly resistant to fracture and wear. They may be used for either anterior or posterior applications. See also resin, composite and resin-filled.
composites, macrofilled,
n.pl strong resins made from small particles filled with either glass or quartz. They may be difficult to polish. See also resin, composite and resin-filled.
composites, microfilled,
n.pl filled resins made from finely ground silica used for anterior esthetic restorations because they polish well and retain their shine. See also resin, composite and resin-filled.

composite

a variety of resins used in restorative dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 4: Early-age compressive strength of composite cement pastes.
Caption: Figure 5: Chemical shrinkage of composite cement pastes at early ages.
Caption: Figure 6: Chemical shrinkage of composite cement pastes at 14 d.
Caption: Figure 7: Autogenous shrinkage of composite cement pastes at early ages.
The corrosion of metallic ILW such as aluminium and magnesium-aluminium alloy, termed Magnox, encapsulated in composite cements is a well-known process that can cause damage of the wasteforms due to hydrogen gas generation and deposition of an expansive layer of corrosion products such as aluminium hydroxide and stratlingite or brucite (Setiadi, 2006; Setiadi et al.
Specific topics include predicting the static contact angle in circular capillary tubes, properties of injectable composite cements and their application in burst fracture of the spine, the surface modification of epoxy-ceramic coatings by plasma treatment, and analyzing low frequency noise induced by a spring floating slab.
Another 25 papers consider such topics as geopolymer binders in composite cements and ceramic-like materials, the role of alkaline cations in geomaterial foams, new geopolymers based on electric arc furnace slag, bond strengths in geopolymer and cement concretes, and recycling industrial wastewater by immobilizing it in geopolymer cement.