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com·pli·ance

(kom-plī'ants),
1. A measure of the distensibility of a chamber expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.
2. The consistency and accuracy with which someone follows the regimen prescribed by a physician or other health professional. Compare: adherence (2), maintenance.
3. A measure of the ease with which a structure or substance is deformed. medicine, physiology usually a measure of the ease with which a hollow viscus (for example, lung, urinary bladder, gallbladder) may be distended, that is, the volume change resulting from the application of a unit pressure differential between the inside and outside of the viscus; the reciprocal of elastance.
[M.E. fr. O.Fr., fr. L. compleo, to fulfill]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

compliance

(kəm-plī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The act of complying with a wish, request, or demand; acquiescence.
b. Medicine Willingness to follow a prescribed course of treatment.
2. A disposition or tendency to yield to the will of others.
3.
a. Extension or displacement of a loaded structure per unit load.
b. Flexibility.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

compliance

The following by a patient of a recommended course of treatment—e.g., taking all prescribed medications, adhering to a recommended diet and exercise plan and reducing or eliminating alcohol or tobacco intake, and so on.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

compliance

The capacity or ability to yield to a pressure or force without disruption or dysfunction; compliance is a measure of tissue distensibility–eg, of an air- or fluid-filled organ Clinical medicine A measure of the extent to which Pts follow a prescribed treatment plan–eg, take drugs, undergo a medical or surgical procedure, exercise or quit smoking. See Patient compliance. Cf Noncompliance Managed care The adherence of a particular organization to statutes or mandates from regulatory agencies—governing agencies or bodies—or to an official mandate or obligatory standard. See HCFA 1500, UB92.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·pli·ance

(kŏm-plī'ăns)
1. A measure of the distensibility of a chamber expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.
2. The consistency and accuracy with which a patient follows the regimen prescribed by a physician or other health care professional.
Compare: adherence (2) , maintenance
3. physiology A measure of the ease with which a hollow viscus (e.g., lung, urinary bladder, gallbladder) may be distended, i.e., the volume change resulting from the application of a unit pressure differential between the inside and outside of the organ or sac; the reciprocal of elastance.
4. Observance of rules or guidelines, such as those governing provision of medical services and billing for them; fulfillment of a requirement.
[M.E. fr. O.Fr., fr. L. compleo, to fulfill]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Compliance

A term used to describe how well a patient's behavior follows medical advice.
Mentioned in: Neurogenic Bladder
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

compliance 

The willingness to strictly follow the instructions given by a clinician. Example: following the cleaning instructions and wearing schedule given after contact lens fitting.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

com·pli·ance

(kŏm-plī'ăns)
Consistency and accuracy with which a patient follows any regimen prescribed by dentist, physician, or other health care professional.
[M.E. fr. O.Fr., fr. L. compleo, to fulfill]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Compliance data was obtained in torsional shear at a variety of temperatures and frequencies.
Loss compliance for the NBR-6 compound was lower than the control at high frequencies or lower temperatures.
Storage compliance for the NBR-6 was higher that either the NBR-12 or the control.
NBR-6 pads had a loss compliance consistently higher than NBR-12.

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