complex odontoma


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com·plex o·don·to·ma

an odontoma in which the various odontogenic tissues are organized in a haphazard arrangement with no resemblance to teeth.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

com·plex o·don·to·ma

(kŏm-pleks ōdon-tōmă)
An odontoma in which the various odontogenic tissues are organized in a haphazard arrangement with no resemblance to teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

com·plex o·don·to·ma

(kŏm-pleks ō-don-tōmă)
Odontoma in which various odontogenic tissues are organized in a haphazard arrangement with no resemblance to teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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An unusual case of erupted composite complex odontoma. J Dent Sci Res 2011;2(2):1-5.
It was suggested that complex odontomas are inherited from a mutant gene or interference, possibly postnatal, with the genetic control of tooth development.
The radiological demonstration of complex odontomas depends on their progressive stage and degree of mineralization.
Complex odontomas are usually located in the first and second molar areas of the mandible or the anterior maxilla?
Radiographically, both compound and complex odontomas appear as clearly outlined, dense radiopaque lesions surrounded by a thin zone of radiolucency.
The majority of odontomas which are situated in the anterior region of the maxilla are compound, while the great majority of odontomas located in the posterior areas, especially in the mandible are complex odontomas. [5] Odontomas may be found at any age; however, most are detected in the first two decades of life.
Although, the aetiology of complex odontomas is not clearly known, several theories have been proposed which include trauma, infection, family history and genetic mutation.
The radiological appearance of complex odontomas depends on their development stage and degree of mineralisation.
The complex odontoma is a painless, slow-growing and expanding lesion that is usually discovered on routine radiographs of the jaw bones, or the failed eruption of a permanent tooth which may lead to the diagnosis of this lesion.
Treatment: Conservative surgical enucleation is considered to be the treatment of choice in most cases of complex odontoma. As odontomas are often associated with impacted teeth, the possibility of eruption of the impacted tooth after a presumed obstructive odontoma has been surgically removed is an important issue.
Sixteen percent of complex odontomas contain isolated areas of ghost cells, some of which may demonstrate melanin pigmentation.