complementarity


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com·ple·men·tar·i·ty

(kom'plĕ-men-tār'i-tē),
1. The degree of base-pairing (A opposite U or T, G opposite C) between two sequences of DNA and/or RNA molecules.
2. The degree of affinity, or fit, between antigen- and antibody-combining sites.
3. The degree of affinity, or fit, between an enzyme and a substrate.

com·ple·men·tar·i·ty

(kom'plĕ-men-tar'i-tē)
1. The degree of base-pairing between two sequences of DNA and/or RNA molecules.
2. The degree of affinity, or fit, of antigen and antibody combining sites.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Minister insisted on the question of rules of origin which should contribute to boosting Arab productive complementarity, achieving self-sufficiency in several products, creating Arab value chains, removing barriers to the influx of inter-Arab exchanges, achieving joint projects and programs and implementation executive plans, as recommended by the Arab ordinary or development summits.
"However, the Constitution is very clear - there has to be complementarity," Briones said.
Hypothesis 1: After the promotion, consumers will have greater (less) willingness to pay for a supplementary product that shares a higher (lower) level of attribute complementarity with the focal product.
In all of these cases, finding the best option requires knowing not just the relative contribution of different interventions, but understanding their complementarity. In a world of limited resources, policymakers must prioritize their investments, including by differentiating the necessary from the desirable.
In Section 2, we describe the multi-document relations of the CST (Cross-Document Structure Theory) model (RADEV; JING; BUDZIKOWSKA, 2000) that codify complementarity and the main methods of identifying the CST relations.
Briggs is especially effective in demonstrating that the other hierarchies in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures have been superseded in modern times and modern theology--who now argues for the complementarity of slave and free or Jew and Greek?
The key to this identification lies within the auspices of observer complementarity, which then remains central to the information paradox in spite of its recent detractors.
The term complementarity originated in a series of addresses by St.
Complementarity (or Integrated Polarity) is the first unifying Law, where ultimately the apparent opposites become unified at the deeper levels of universal Consciousness.
Steve C Roach, Critical Theory of International Politics Complementarity, Justice and Governance, New York: Routledge, 2010.
El Zeidy, eds., The International Criminal Court and Complementarity: From Theory to Practice, 2 Vols.
Many studies have emphasized resource complementarity as an essential component in the potential of an alliance to create synergy effects (see, for example, Lin, Yang, and Arya 2009; Osborn and Hagedoorn 1997).