complement deficiency


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complement deficiency

A state in which any of the complement proteins is subnormal
Complement deficiencies–associated disorders
C1
C1r    SLE, renal disease, repeated infections
C1s    SLE
C2    SLE, vasculitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, dermatomyositis
C3 Repeated infections
C4 SLE
C5 SLE, gonococcal disease
C6 Relapsing meningococcal meningitis, gonococcal infection
C7 Raynaud's disease, chronic renal disease, gonococcal infection
C8 SLE, gonococcal infection
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
meningitidis strains; the lack of such reports suggests that complement deficiency might be a predisposing factor, and all the reported isolates were determined to be capsule null locus (cnl) strains, which lacked the genetic islands encoding the entire capsule (5-7).
TABLE Who should get vaccinated--and when TARGET POPULATION VACCINE TYPE Children 2-10 years at increased risk * MPSV4 ([dagger]) Adolescents 11-12 years MCV4 Adolescents at high school entry or 15 years MCV4 of age without prior vaccination College freshmen planning to reside in MCV4 ([double dagger]) dormitories Patients ages 11-55 at increased risk * MCV4 ([double dagger]) Patients older than 55 years at increased MPSV4 risk * Microbiologist, lab personnel exposed to N MCV4 ([double dagger]) meningitides Military recruits MCV4 ([double dagger]) * "Increased risk" is defined by terminal complement deficiency, anatomic or functional asplenia, travel to endemic areas, HIV infection (optional).
Other high-risk groups that should be vaccinated include: military recruits, travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic, microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of Neisseria meningitidis, individuals with anatomic or functional asplenia, and individuals with terminal complement deficiency.
Vaccination also is recommended for other persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease (i.e., military recruits, travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic, microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of Neisseria meningitidis, persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, and persons with terminal complement deficiency) (1).
The vaccine is still recommended for others at risk, including first-year college students, military recruits, travelers, scientists who are exposed to meningitis, patients with anatomic or functional asplenia, and patients with terminal complement deficiency. Also, in February 2005, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended routine vaccination of adolescents at the preadolescent health-care visit (at ages 11-12 years).
High-risk children are those with component complement deficiency, HIV infection, or anatomic or functional asplenia.

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