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com·plaint

(kom-plānt'),
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]

complaint

/com·plaint/ (kom-plānt´) a disease, symptom, or disorder.
chief complaint  the symptom or group of symptoms about which the patient first consults the doctor; the presenting symptom.

complaint

(kəm-plānt′)
n.
a. A bodily disorder or disease; a malady or ailment.
b. The symptom or distress about which a patient seeks medical assistance.

complaint

Etymology: L, complangere, to beat the breast
1 (in law) a pleading by a plaintiff made under oath to initiate a suit. It is a statement of the formal charge and the cause for action against the defendant. For a minor offense the defendant is tried on the basis of the complaint. A more serious felony prosecution requires an indictment with evidence presented by a state's attorney.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
any ailment, problem, or symptom identified by the client, patient, member of the person's family, or other knowledgeable person. The chief complaint often causes the person to seek health care.
A symptom of which a person is aware or which causes discomfort, generally described from a patient’s perspective—e.g., loss of weight, crushing chest pain, fever of unknown origin (FUO)—and which is often the principal reason for seeking medical attention; in the working parlance in the US, complaints are divided into chief—major—complaints and minor complaints

complaint

A Sx of which a person is aware or which causes discomfort, generally described from a Pt's perspective–eg, loss of weight, crushing chest pain, FUO, and is often the principal reason for seeking medical attention; in the working parlance in the US, complaints are divided into chief–major complaints and minor complaints. See Chief complaint, Minor complaint.

com·plaint

(kŏm-plānt')
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]

complaint,

n a patient-described symptom, problem, or malady. See also illness and disease.

com·plaint

(kŏm-plānt')
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]
References in periodicals archive ?
Among those who had raised concerns, half said it was "difficult" to complain and only 37% said they felt their concern was listened to and taken seriously.
I can complain about the amount of time the kids have off school or enjoy the time with them because in a few years they will probably be off to university and building their own families.
If more consumers complain, it will send a clear message that more needs to be done to stop unwanted calls and texts.
Meanwhile the merchants who import electrical appliances to the city complain lack of demand in the markets which has caused great loss to their market.
If we don't at least show up at the polls, we have little right to complain about what "they" do to us next.
It may seem obvious to you why you want to complain and what you want to have happen, but you have to be very specific in a complaint to give yourself the best chance of success.
These people all had full-time jobs that conceivably gave them things to complain about, such as their work hours, their pay, their superiors or even co-workers.
RALF SCHUMACHER claims Williams teammate Juan Pablo Montoya complains too much about clashes on the track.
When a patient complains of these symptoms, he recommends asking her about other symptoms of depression.
It soon came to light that no one could complain about every meal every day.
99), consumers "[feel complaining is] too time consuming, believe that nothing will come of it, do not know how or where to complain, or believe the amount is too small or the issue too trivial.
The court found that the jail superintendent was entitled to qualified immunity from liability for his decision to have the pretrial detainee shackled when outside of his cell based on the wording of the note that the detainee had sent to the superintendent complaining of his loss of commissary privileges, because the right to complain to prison administrators was not clearly established.