competition

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com·pe·ti·tion

(kom'pĕ-tish'ŭn),
The process by which the activity or presence of one substance interferes with, or suppresses, the activity of another substance with similar affinities.

competition

/com·pe·ti·tion/ (kom″pĕ-tish´un) the phenomenon in which two structurally similar molecules “compete” for a single binding site on a third molecule.compet´itive
antigenic competition  an altered response to an immunogen resulting from the simultaneous or close administration of two immunogens: the response to one is normal, while the response to the second is suppressed or diminished.

com·pe·ti·tion

(kom'pĕ-tish'ŭn)
The process by which the activity or presence of one substance interferes with, or suppresses, the activity of another substance with similar affinities.

competition

the interaction between organisms striving for the same end, including competition for resources (food, living space), mates, etc. Such interaction may adversely affect their growth and survival. See INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION, INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in conducting this analysis for a recent client, Scannell & Kurz found that the institution went from the lowest priced in its competitor set based on sticker price to the highest priced based on net price.
All too often competitors tend to emulate each other with strategies that produce incremental improvements in cost or quality.
He was one of nearly 750 competitors at the third annual Santa Clarita Special Olympics.
These questions often arise in sectors where companies face difficult investment, pricing and bidding decisions that depend on the choices their competitors will make.
Though Microsoft will be barred from retaliatory pricing schemes and from barring or trying to prevent competitors from shipping machines with non-Windows OSes, these strictures were expected.
These findings emphasize that business communicators need an effective means of obtaining, analyzing and evaluating strategic intelligence about competitors and the industry in which they do business--information that clearly helps communicators understand the plans and actions of competitors (and others) and, as a result, helps them make their own effective, competitive plans and take action.
Standard Oil's competitors complained bitterly about these discounts (called "rebates"), which the railroads kept secret from other oil companies.
For starters, the company was embroiled in numerous lawsuits, from patent fights with competitors to shareholder battles with disgruntled stock owners, and even to an investigation by Congress of how a competitors' F.
And coming up with a plan before knowing the environment you're operating in, will only lead to a "me too" marketing strategy in which you copy what your competitors are doing or run with something you picked up at a conference.
In the words of one of the wisest people I know, this amounts to "polishing the rotting apple when the customer really wants an orange and can buy one from your best competitor.