competence

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competence

 [kom´pĕ-tens]
1. a principle of professional practice, identifying the ability of the provider to administer safe and reliable care on a consistent basis.
2. the ability of a patient to manage activities of daily living.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tents),
1. The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. In psychiatry, an antidote to certain types of anxiety.
3. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
4. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
5. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
6. In psychiatry, the mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
7. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli.
[Fr. competence, fr. L.L. competentia, congruity]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

competence

(kŏm′pĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The ability to do something well or efficiently.
b. A range of skill or ability: a task beyond his competence.
c. A specific ability or skill: a surprising competence in dealing with animals.
2. Law The quality or condition of being legally qualified or fit to perform an act.
3. Microbiology The ability of bacteria to be genetically transformable.
4. Medicine The ability to respond immunologically to bacteria, viruses, or other antigenic agents.
5. Linguistics The knowledge that enables one to speak and understand a language.
6. Sufficient means for a comfortable existence.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

competence

Medspeak
The ability to effectively perform the activities of a particular occupation (or role) to the standards expected.

Psychiatry
A legally determined capability to act on one's own behalf.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

competence

Patient's rights A legal term for the capacity of a person to act on his/her own behalf; the ability to understand information presented, to appreciate the consequences of acting–or not acting–on that information, and to make a choice. See Autonomy. Cf Incapacity, Incompetence Psychology A constellation of abilities possessed by a person for adequate decision-making; competency is a measure of a person's autonomy and ability to give permission for diagnostic tests or for dangerous, but potentially life-saving procedures. Cf Autonomy Vox populi Skill, ability. See Cultural competence.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
1. The quality of being skilled or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
3. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
4. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
5. psychiatry The mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
6. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli. Sometimes called competency.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

competence

  1. a period when a differentiating cell or tissue is capable of switching to an alternative developmental PATHWAY. See INDUCTION, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, GENE SWITCHING, CANALIZATION.
  2. a state in bacteria when they are able to receive DNA from other bacteria in a process called TRANSFORMATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about competence

Q. Would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the olympics? I am a shuttle relay state champion. I won many cups in state and country level. My long-time-goal is to have my name at least on the Olympics list. But here is a new problem to spoil my goal. I am diagnosed as bipolar-I. Now my worry is would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the Olympics? Or will I be able to compete in the Special Olympics?

A. wow...good question...can mental health patient be a special Olympic athletes. i think you should check it out with simple phone call, here is how to locate a special Olympics Program near you:
http://info.specialolympics.org/Special+Olympics+Public+Website/English/Program_Locator/default.htm

More discussions about competence
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the follow up of the implementation of the above mentioned approaches, several pieces of research have been carried out to evaluate and self-evaluate the acquired competences by students in several academic fields (Lopez & Parra, 2017; Ortiz, Marta-Lazo, & Martin, 2016; Ramos, Chiva, & Gomez, 2017; Serrano, Biedermann, & Santolaya 2016).
All this with the intention to check if the professional competences needed for the professional field have been developed in students, in which grade, where students obtained most of them (school, internships, workplace) and how students organize themselves according to their own perspective.
Competence-earning relationship is empirically evidenced for competences acquired level, required level and net level in Table 2.
Strong relationship between acquired competences and the required competences, found by Garci-Aracil and van der Velden (2008), encouraged us to make analyses for both acquired and required level of competences.
Keywords: Professionalism, Competences, Dentistry, Attitude, Pakistan.
Society in its broader meaning, however, is improved not only by entrepreneurs but also by individuals with entrepreneurship competence (set of knowledge, attitudes and skills for opportunity recognition and exploitation, value creation, and action orientation).
Pour y parvenir, il est necessaire pour le pays de se doter d'une feuille de route pourfaciliter a ces competences de s'investir au Maroc et d'avoir une meilleure visibilite sur les opportunites offertes, a-t-il dit, precisant que nombreux sont les MRE qui cherchent le moyen et l'occasion de s'acquitter de leurs dettes envers leurs pays et village en lui rendant service.
The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) does not describe specific qualifications or an individual's competences and particular qualifications should be referenced to the appropriate European Qualifications Framework level by way of the relevant national qualifications systems." (Official Journal of the European Union, 2008: 2).
Keywords: Social Competence, Academic Achievement, High and low achievers, Pakistan.
Keywords: Competence, teachers' competence, subject matter knowledge

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