compensatory damages


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Related to compensatory damages: nominal damages, punitive damages, Consequential damages, aggravated damages
A monetary sum—damages—determined by a jury in court, and awarded to a party injured by negligence, that attempts to restore the victim to the state he/she would have been in had the ‘wrong’ not occurred

compensatory damages

In a lawsuit, money awarded to an injured individual to repay that person for the actual costs that have resulted from the injury. The damages should restore the injured party to his or her preinjury status.
See also: damages
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References in periodicals archive ?
A federal judge said BP must indemnify Transocean for some compensatory damage claims over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
Campbell, the Supreme Court joined the discussion of "excessive" punitive damages and held that such damages generally cannot exceed compensatory damages by more than a single-digit ratio.
Though the court ruled that the compensatory damages were excessive, the judge also said he was not troubled by the punitive damages award.
Compensatory damages are those which are most directly related to a contractor's failure to complete a project.
Of Homeland Security) overturned $576,000 of the compensatory damages.
Although a state statute limited compensatory damages to out-of-pocket expenses, the jury also awarded $1.
5 million on top of $800,000 in compensatory damages to the family of Jesse Williams, a longtime Marlboro smoker - a ratio of more than 99 to 1.
The first tier limits punitive damages to $1 million or three times the amount of compensatory damages, whichever is greater, in cases where an employer participated in the wrongful conduct, condoned or ratified the conduct, or if the employer engaged in gross negligence that contributed to the injury.
IBM argues that it had alerted Informix to its patents and is seeking compensatory damages and enforcement.
7 times the actual hours her lawyers spent on the case multiplied by a prevailing hourly rate--even though the jury awarded her only $50,000 in compensatory damages.
The Court noted that the Civil Rights Act of 1991 provides victims of intentional discrimination the right "to a jury trial, at which it may recover compensatory damages for future pecuniary losses, emotional pain, suffering, inconvenience, mental anguish, loss of enjoyment of life and other nonpecuniary losses, as well as punitive damages.
1 million, excluding compensatory damages and other settlements.