compensation


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compensation

 [kom″pen-sa´shun]
1. the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
2. a mental process that may be either conscious or, more frequently, an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by such cardiac and circulatory adjustments as tachycardia, cardiac hypertrophy, and increase of blood volume by sodium and water retention.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pen-sā'shŭn),
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for fancied or real deficiencies.
[L. com-penso, pp. -atus, to weigh together, counterbalance]

compensation

/com·pen·sa·tion/ (kom″pen-sa´shun)
1. the counterbalancing of any defect.
2. the conscious or unconscious process by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by cardiac and circulatory adjustments.

dosage compensation  in genetics, the mechanism by which the effect of the two X chromosomes of the normal female is rendered identical to that of the one X chromosome of the normal male.

compensation

(kŏm′pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of compensating or the state of being compensated.
2. Biology The increase in size or activity of one part of an organism or organ that makes up for the loss or dysfunction of another.
3. Psychology Behavior that develops either consciously or unconsciously to offset a real or imagined deficiency, as in personality or physical ability.

com′pen·sa′tion·al adj.

compensation

[kom′pənsā′shən]
Etymology: L, compensare, to balance
1 the process of counterbalancing any defect in body structure or function.
2 the process of maintaining an adequate blood flow through such cardiac and circulatory mechanisms as tachycardia, fluid retention with increased venous return, and ventricular hypertrophy. Lack of compensation indicates a diseased heart muscle. See also compensated heart failure.
3 a complex defense mechanism that allows one to avoid the unpleasant or painful emotional stimuli that result from a feeling of inferiority or inadequacy. Examples include making an extraordinary effort to overcome a disability, scorning a quality that one lacks ("sour grapes"), and substituting hard work and excellent performance in one field for a lack of ability in another.
4 changes in structural relationships that accommodate foundation disturbances and maintain balance. See also overcompensation.

compensation

Orthopedics A change of structure, position or function of a part in an attempt by the body to adjust to or neutralize the abnormal force of a deviation of structure, position or function of another part Psychiatry
1. An unconscious defense mechanism in which one attempts to compensate for real or perceived defects.
2. A conscious process in which one strives to compensate for real or perceived defects of physique, performance skills, or psychological attributes; often the 2 types merge. See Individual psychology, Overcompensation.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for imagined or real deficiencies.

compensation

alteration of direction of movement of adjacent body segments or joint function, normalizing function of other body segments or joints (that would otherwise function in an abnormal manner); i.e. an unconscious process by which change in one direction is counteracted by change in another direction, so that the original change is no longer obvious

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.

compensation,

n the monetary reward for rendering a service; insurance providing financial return to employees in the event of an injury that occurs during the performance of their duties and that prohibits work. Compulsory in many states.
compensation, unemployment,
n insurance covering the employee so that compensation may be provided for loss of income as a result of unemployment.

compensation

the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
1. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing signs.
2. in preventive medicine the payment of farmers for losses incurred by the destruction of their livestock when controlling an infectious disease.

depth-gain compensation
see time gain compensation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Black Lung Benefits Act provides for workers' compensation for miners suffering from black lung.
On the other hand, an award that is essentially a promise to make such a transfer at some point in the future (commonly known as a restricted stock unit), may constitute deferred compensation under Sec.
When a company grants an employee an NQSO, it recognizes the related compensation expense and records a tax benefit equal to the compensation expense multiplied by the company's income tax rate.
The Nonqualified Defined Contribution and Other Deferred Compensation Plans table would disclose year-end balance, the executive and company contributions and earnings and withdrawals that apply to that year.
It was a very sticky policy issue,'' said Peter Turcic, director of the Department of Labor's Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation.
IRS Notice 2005-1 provides guidelines to help tax practitioners transition their clients to full compliance by the end of this year, including some tricky deferred compensation issues such as stock options and stock appreciation rights.
If the promise to pay future compensation was funded with property (for example, employer stock) or other forms of security, the benefits of deferral were lost.
In the survey, manufacturing managers/plant managers of a public firm falling in the median sales volume enjoyed a median salary of $77,300 and a total compensation of $78,400.
Companies indicating their primary property type to be retail tended pay higher compensation than other property types.
Sixty-nine CEOs, or about 28 percent, experienced declines in total cash compensation from 1998 to 1999.
39] For the sake of simply demonstrating the efficacy of compensation for a wrong within the confines of this brief paper, however, a more focused approach is warranted.
Gary Chalus, "Defensive Compensation as a Response to Ego Threat: A Replication," Psychological Reports 38 (June, 1976): 699-702; Patricia East and Karen Rook, "Compensatory Patterns of Support among Children's Peer Relationships," Developmental Psychology 28 (June, 1992): 163-72; Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski, "Compensatory Self-inflation: A Response to the Threat to Self-Regard of Public Failure," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 49 (June, 1985): 273-80.

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