compensation


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compensation

 [kom″pen-sa´shun]
1. the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
2. a mental process that may be either conscious or, more frequently, an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by such cardiac and circulatory adjustments as tachycardia, cardiac hypertrophy, and increase of blood volume by sodium and water retention.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pen-sā'shŭn),
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for fancied or real deficiencies.
[L. com-penso, pp. -atus, to weigh together, counterbalance]

compensation

(kŏm′pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of compensating or the state of being compensated.
2. Biology The increase in size or activity of one part of an organism or organ that makes up for the loss or dysfunction of another.
3. Psychology Behavior that develops either consciously or unconsciously to offset a real or imagined deficiency, as in personality or physical ability.

com′pen·sa′tion·al adj.

compensation

Orthopedics A change of structure, position or function of a part in an attempt by the body to adjust to or neutralize the abnormal force of a deviation of structure, position or function of another part Psychiatry
1. An unconscious defense mechanism in which one attempts to compensate for real or perceived defects.
2. A conscious process in which one strives to compensate for real or perceived defects of physique, performance skills, or psychological attributes; often the 2 types merge. See Individual psychology, Overcompensation.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for imagined or real deficiencies.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
References in periodicals archive ?
IRS Notice 2005-1 provides guidelines to help tax practitioners transition their clients to full compliance by the end of this year, including some tricky deferred compensation issues such as stock options and stock appreciation rights.
"There is a strong incentive these days for REIT executives to be more accountable than ever for their company's performance and to have their compensation align with such performance.
Many researchers argue that firms are doing a pretty good job, Haubrich and Popova, academic researchers in the field of executive compensation wrote in their journal article in Economic Theory, "The results [of our analysis of CEO compensation] suggest ...
* Taxation of deferred compensation could be further deferred from its original payment schedule (or the form of payment changed) after the underlying services had been performed, if the agreement to defer was entered into more than a de minimis period before the first payment was due.
Nationally, a CEO of a private firm with a sales volume of $3 million-$6.9 million had a median salary of $150,000 and a total compensation of $165,000.
In an aircraft development program, as an aircraft flight control system improves, the test pilot's compensation improves and without a significant event, such as a recalibration of the pilot's compensation experience, the compensation will continue to improve.
With a 457 plan, deferrals should be included as compensation on Form 990 for an officer, director, key employee, or one of the five highest-paid employees.
Compensation administrators are left with a daunting challenge--how to decide who deserves to be compensated.
Anyone who is involved with executive compensation and compensation committees usually has an opinion on how things should be done and Jim Reda is not an exception to this rule.
[39] For the sake of simply demonstrating the efficacy of compensation for a wrong within the confines of this brief paper, however, a more focused approach is warranted.
DOD provides active duty personnel with a comprehensive compensation package that includes a mix of cash, such as basic pay; noncash benefits, like health care; and deferred compensation, such as retirement pension; however, most studies that have examined the value of military compensation to servicemembers do not assess all components of the compensation package.

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