compensation

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Related to compensating: compensating balance, compensating curve

compensation

 [kom″pen-sa´shun]
1. the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
2. a mental process that may be either conscious or, more frequently, an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by such cardiac and circulatory adjustments as tachycardia, cardiac hypertrophy, and increase of blood volume by sodium and water retention.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pen-sā'shŭn),
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for fancied or real deficiencies.
[L. com-penso, pp. -atus, to weigh together, counterbalance]

compensation

(kŏm′pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of compensating or the state of being compensated.
2. Biology The increase in size or activity of one part of an organism or organ that makes up for the loss or dysfunction of another.
3. Psychology Behavior that develops either consciously or unconsciously to offset a real or imagined deficiency, as in personality or physical ability.

com′pen·sa′tion·al adj.

compensation

Orthopedics A change of structure, position or function of a part in an attempt by the body to adjust to or neutralize the abnormal force of a deviation of structure, position or function of another part Psychiatry
1. An unconscious defense mechanism in which one attempts to compensate for real or perceived defects.
2. A conscious process in which one strives to compensate for real or perceived defects of physique, performance skills, or psychological attributes; often the 2 types merge. See Individual psychology, Overcompensation.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for imagined or real deficiencies.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
References in periodicals archive ?
Checking the line's progress every 15 minutes, or triple-checking work are big compensating behaviors.
In general, once you start asking key questions about common problems on your packaging line and pulling on the thread of compensating behaviors, you will inevitably find the root cause of your packaging line problems.
Compensating adjustments must be paid within 90 days of filing the tax return for the pertinent transaction year.
65-17 for payment of compensating adjustments, e.g., check or wire transfer, offsets through intercompany accounts, or recharacterized dividends.
Materials for a compensating capacitor for a lumped-element or printed-circuit mm-wave VCO or oscillator are shown in Table 1.
A lumped-element GaAs Gunn oscillator was built and tested over a -40 [degrees] to +71 [degrees] C temperature range with and without a compensating capacitor.
In a recent paper, we examine two issues in the measurement of compensating differentials.
Taxpayers are wary that some treaty partners will not recognize the effect of a compensating adjustment.
"We want to tell the government that it shouldn't focus on compensating fishermen affected by the port project only.
Conversely, if the auditor noted numerous errors in information generated by the accounting system and no compensating strengths in the control environment, the absence of control procedures generally would lead the auditor to conclude a reportable condition exists.
Jones's group writes that these steady conditions mean either that something is compensating for the greenhouse warming or that the climate system is less sensitive to greenhouse gases than was thought.