compassion fatigue


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to compassion fatigue: burnout

compassion fatigue

Cynicism, emotional exhaustion, or self-centeredness occurring in a health care professional previously dedicated to his or her work and clients.
See also: fatigue

compassion fatigue,

n emotional drain experienced by caregivers us-ually after caring for another with a progressive illness.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, these caregivers may be at increased risk of becoming mentally and physically drained, thus resulting in compassion fatigue or burnout.
In order to be a well-rounded healthcare professional not at risk of burnout or compassion fatigue, the healthcare practitioner should recognise him/herself as a resource that needs nurturing and care, rather than a limitless skilled tool at the mercy of their environment.
Compassion fatigue can happen slowly over time, or it can come on suddenly.
It has long been observed that qualities that make counselors effective with their clients--such as empathy, compassion, and caring--may also leave them vulnerable to such negative outcomes as compassion fatigue and burnout (Figley, 1995; Lawson, Venart, Hazier, & Kottler, 2007; Pines & Maslach, 1978).
Now that the holiday season is over, many of us are suffering from compassion fatigue.
Stress-related psychological disorders like burn out syndrome, anxiety, depression and compassion fatigue are common among health care professionals, especially nurses.
The idea that nurses and other professional caregivers are susceptible to what has come to be known as "compassion fatigue" has received wide-spread acceptance; however, the long-term effect of compassion fatigue on non-professional caregivers has received far less focus.
Without a structured program of help, nurses unknowingly may slip into a condition known as compassion fatigue, a combination of burnout and secondary traumatic stress from witnessing the suffering of others, becoming indifferent and irritable, showing poor judgment, and permanently losing their "ability to nurture.
Also presenting at the meeting was WNA Secretary Kathryn Schroeter, who spoke about compassion fatigue, burnout, and workplace bullying.
The wide-ranging impact of stress is examined, placing particular emphasis on compassion fatigue and the burnout syndrome.
Creating an illusory epidemic of sex trafficking wastes public money, drives compassion fatigue, and deprives Americans of the information they need to fight real problems-like the violence against sex workers Whalen mentions, and the difficulty minority youth have in getting contraceptive supplies, information, and the motivation to act responsibly.