compartmentalization


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compartmentalization

(kŏm-part″ment″ăl-ĭ-zā′shŏn)
1. In psychology, the division or splitting of emotions from thought; of work from leisure; or of action from logic or morality; dissociation.
2. The division of the cell or of other biological structures into distinct regions with separate functions.
3. In health care management, the splitting of a large task into smaller parts.
compartmentalize (ment′ăl-īz″)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Adams, "PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterases: modular enzymes that orchestrate signalling cross-talk, desensitization and compartmentalization," Biochem.
In the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, utility and compartmentalization were the dominant features of the mass-productive process.
In the compartmentalization model, the structure of cognitive organization (i.
For starters, it has the potential to hold back human development through artificial compartmentalization of skills and markets.
On the minus side, there is a minor feeling of compartmentalization about it, an absence of ultimate depth, some softness about the dynamics, and a lack of truly deep bass that intrude upon one's complete surrender to a willing suspension of disbelief.
His tables of musicians and countries facilitate the researching of a player's particular instrument or a writer's nation, forcing a neat compartmentalization to make us see beyond boundaries.
The modular construction provides for continuous operation even if a tank is out of service, and the design provides for compartmentalization and inert blanketing for increased safety.
Mirrors and doubling are also essential: Baseman often edges the top or bottom of a drawing with a frieze of windows, in a Joseph Cornell-like strategy by which compartmentalization allows for serial but discrete narrations inside a frame.
Nonetheless, freeing us from total compartmentalization in period enclaves, the spirit of her book puts us within reach of being able to take the next step, for instance, to Catherine Hall's recent nineteenth-century account, Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination, 1830-1867 (Chicago, 2002).
There are very few internal controls and little compartmentalization within the system--once you have access, you're in.
2+]-dependent cell adhesion molecules that are thought to play key roles in differentiation, segregation and compartmentalization of the vertebrate central nervous system.
The third form of dialogue is Compartmentalization.