companion

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companion

Social medicine An individual with whom a person has a close personal relationship Examples Spouses, lovers, children, parents, friends, pets and others, who provide an individual with a sense of belonging and of being needed. See Companionship.
References in classic literature ?
A band of beings, who resembled demons rather than men, sporting in their nightly revels across the bleak plain, was in truth approaching, at a fearful rate, and in a direction to leave little hope that some one among them, at least, would not pass over the spot where the trapper and his companions lay.
Though, of course, the occasions for displaying that vice of nature were seldom afforded to Ginevra in the life of a studio, still, the specimens she had now and then given of her vindictive disposition had left a strong impression on the minds of her companions.
In passing his gentler companions Heyward uttered a few words of encouragement, and was pleased to find that, though fatigued with the exercise of the day, they appeared to entertain no suspicion that their present embarrassment was other than the result of accident.
Barbicane quickly put out the gas and lay down by his companions, and the profound silence was only broken by the ticking of the chronometer marking the seconds.
cried the wounded man, raising himself upon one knee, and lifting towards his companion an arm bearing a useless sword.
He bolted out of the companion straight into his captain who took the flare from him and held it high above his head.
Jimmie's companion, evidently overcome with merriment, pointed a grimy forefinger in Pete's direction.
My companion shouts at the highest pitch of his voice.
rejoined her companion, still gazing towards the miserable object; "and if he should be ill
After a brief discussion, in which we both of us expressed our resolution of not descending into the bay until the ship's departure, I suggested to my companion that little of it as there was, we should divide the bread into six equal portions, each of which should be a day's allowance for both of us.
Dunster bought wine and sandwiches, and his companion followed his example.
Now it required no very blameable degree of suspicion to imagine that Mr Jones and his ragged companion had certain purposes in their intention, which, though tolerated in some Christian countries, connived at in others, and practised in all, are however as expressly forbidden as murder, or any other horrid vice, by that religion which is universally believed in those countries.