Vespula vulgaris

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Vespula vulgaris

(vĕs′pūl-ă vūl-gār′ĭs) [NL., common (little) wasp]
The scientific name for the yellow jacket. The yellow jacket is a black-and-yellow-striped stinging wasp whose venom, abbreviated Ves v by the World Health Organization, may cause anaphylaxis in susceptible individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determining the origin of invasions and demonstrating a lack of enemy release from microsporidian pathogens in common wasps (Vespula vulgaris).
Common wasps, for it is they that launch wave after wave of aerial attacks on summer barbecues, are the one you're most likely to encounter, although other species do occur in the north west.
So perhaps it's one of those, but it's certainly not a common wasp (Vespula vulgaris).
Andy Noy, who runs a pest-control business in Leiston, Suffolk, said: "The nest looks like a grey football and the nest fabric is much tougher than common wasp nests.
Busy predator does have its uses (just stay clear of the sharp end):There are two types of wasps commonly found in the UK, the Common Wasp (Vespula vulgaris) and the German Wasp (Vespula germanica.
The common wasp creates a `paper' nest from chewed wood pulp in holes in the ground or tree trunks, or the roofs of buildings.
The list also includes the Mediterranean mussel, the common wasp, starlings, brown trout and mice.
In good news for picnickers, though, common wasps also had a poor year across much of southern England.
The good news for summer picnickers this year was that there were hardly any common wasps.
Unlike common wasps which disappear almost entirely in autumn, hornets stick around and make nests out of chewed-up wood pulp.
A tree-wasp colony has only a few hundred inhabitants, but colonies of common wasps number in the thousands, so a single queen can't keep a nest under control.