valerian

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va·le·ri·an

(vă-lē'rē-ăn),
1. The rhizome and roots of Valeriana officinalis (family Valerianaceae), a herb native to southern Europe and northern Asia, cultivated also in the U.K. and the U.S.; has been used as a sedative in hysteria and at menopause.
2. Referring to a class of terpene alkaloids obtained from valerian (1).
Synonym(s): vandal root
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

valerian

(və-lîr′ē-ən)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the family Valerianaceae, especially Valeriana officinalis, native to Eurasia and widely cultivated for its small, fragrant, white to pink or lavender flowers and for use in medicine.
2. The dried rhizomes of Valeriana officinalis, used medicinally as a sedative.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

valerian

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb that contains alkaloids, actinidine, choline, glycoside, resins, tannins, valepotriates, valerenic acid and volatile oils (including limonene); it is antispasmodic, antitussive, and sedative, and may act on the central nervous system. Valerian has been used for anxiety, colic, dandruff, dyspepsia, headaches, hypertension, insomnia, menstrual cramping, nervousness, stress and tachyarrhythmias.
 
Toxicity
Valerian should not be given to infants, and should be used with caution in pregnant women; in excess, it may cause headaches, irritability and blurred vision.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

va·le·ri·an

(vă-ler'ē-ăn)
An herb (Valeriana officinalis) that is used to treat anxiety, insomnia, sleep disorders, and restlessness due to nervous disorders.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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