thyme

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thyme

(tīm),
The dried leaves and flowering tops of Thymus vulgaris (family Labiatae), used as a seasoning; it contains a volatile oil (t. oil) and is a source of thymol.
[G. thymon, thyme]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thyme

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb that contains alcohols (linalool), flavonoids, saponins, tannins and volatile oils (e.g., carvecrol, phenol, terpinine and thymol). Primarily used as a culinary seasoning, thyme is antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, carminative, diaphoretic and an expectorant; it is used for colds, upper respiratory tract infections, and topically in liniments for rheumatic pain.
 
Toxicity
In excess, thyme can cause gastrointesinal discomfort; it should not be used in pregnancy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

thyme

(tīm)
The dried leaves and flowering tops of Thymus vulgaris, used as a seasoning; it contains a volatile oil and is a source of thymol.
[G. thymon, thyme]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
COMMON THYME (Thymus vulgaris; also called English thyme).
Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris; sometimes also called English thyme).
Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris), sometimes sold as English thyme, is the basic culinary thyme - the one you reach for to spice a soup, stew, or pot roast.
Some--such as common thyme, edible scented geraniums, rosemary, and winter savory--serve both functions.
For use in cooking, try the classic English or common thyme (T.