Reed

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Related to common reed: Phragmites, Phragmites communis

Reed

 [rēd]
Walter (1851–1902). American bacteriologist, born in Gloucester County, Virginia. As a military physician, Reed was appointed during the Spanish–American War chief of a committee to investigate typhoid fever epidemic in the army camps. In 1899, when yellow fever was particularly severe in Cuba, he again was appointed chairman of a committee to study its method of transmission, and he proved by thorough experimentation that yellow fever was carried only by a certain species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

Reed

(rēd),
Dorothy M., U.S. pathologist, 1874-1964. See: Reed cell, Reed-Sternberg cell, Sternberg-Reed cell.

Reed

(rēd),
Walter, 1851-1902. U.S. Army surgeon, elucidated epidemiology of yellow fever. See: Reed-Frost model.
References in periodicals archive ?
The common reed (Phragmites australis) as a source of roughage in ruminant nutrition.
The aims of Experiment 1 were to identify the indigenous populations of LAB in common reed, quantify reed's WSC content, and compare the quality of fermented silage by adding LAB or/and glucose to the silage without additives.
Saltonstall, Phragmites Field Guide: Distinguishing Native and Exotic Forms of Common Reed (Phragmites australis) in the United States, Plant Conservation Alliance, Weeds Gone Wild, 2010 http://www.nps.gov/plants/ alien/pubs/index.htm.
Gizinska-Gorna et al., "The efficiency of pollution removal from domestic wastewater in constructed wetland systems with vertical flow with common reed and glyceria maxima," Journal of Ecological Engineering, vol.
The purpose of this study was (1) to estimate the eutrophication level of the lake on Paljassaare on the basis of the chemical characteristics of common reed (Phragmites australis) in the phenophase of early flowering of clones and (2) to compare these estimates to the relevant findings for other Estonian waterbodies.
Examples may be found growing in the marshy ground off the Janabiyah Road, on the right, just after the first set of traffic lights as one comes from the Saudi Causeway, intermingled with the Common Reed (Phragmites australis).
The research, by an interdisciplinary University of Delaware (UD) team led by Harsh Bais, assistant professor of plant and soil sciences, takes into account the common reed, Phragmites australis, which ranks as one of the world's most invasive plants.
A common Reed claim was that the Religious Right merely wanted a place at the table, to be part of the political dialogue.
Patches of common reed may explode into world-domination mode with a little help from friends.
The Common Reed (Phragmites australis) and the Giant Reed (Arundo donax) grow along roadsides adjacent to these irrigation canals.
Common reed Phragmites australis: control and effects upon biodiversity in freshwater nontidal wetlands.
Only the hardy emergent species such as common reed and reedmace can survive in these conditions, eventually leading to poor habitat diversity.