commensal

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Related to commensals: plankton, symbiosis

commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Soluble fiber is not digestible in the upper bowel and is thereby provided to resident commensal bacteria lower in the bowel.
However, further studies with more cases are needed to establish reliable diagnostic criteria for respiratory pathogens based on the relative read abundance compared with commensal bacteria.
Conversely, an aberrant activation of MCs may alter the normal cooperation with commensal bacteria and result in inflammation, as demonstrated in a mouse model of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes bearing a missense NLRP3 mutation [24].
epidermidis is a common commensal bacterium of the skin, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen.
Stress also significantly alters the pattern of commensal organisms.
Commensal bacteria can alter virulence of bacterial pathogens and interfere with antibiotic treatment.
A healthy gut contains a balanced mixture of many commensal (beneficial) species.
arrokeana outside its host, to search for evidence about whether this relationship is either commensal or parasitic.
pneumoniae from various ophthalmic infections (dachryocystitis: 28, corneal ulcer: 7, conjunctivitis: 2 and panophthalamitis: 1), 9 isolates from systemic infections (4 with pneumonia, 3 with meningitis, and 2 with septicaemia) and 14 commensal isolates which were serotyped earlier (9) (total 25 serotypes) were included in the study.
The huge number of resident microorganisms, identified by modern high-throughput sequencing technology, is called commensal microbiome.
It is unclear how these commensals regulate immunologic responses to food antigens, but there is mounting evidence that the microbiological environment of the intestine has a profound influence on oral tolerance [1-5].