commensal

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commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, it is possible that adult flies live commensally with these ants but more research needs to be done.
Typically they are found living commensally with humans, but House Mice may also establish populations in natural environments (Schwarz and Schwarz 1943; Nagorsen 2005).
To the Editor: Enterococcus faecalis, which exists commensally in the gut in warm-blooded animals and humans, is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of community-acquired and health care-associated infections, such as urinary tract and intraabdominal infections, bacteremia, and endocarditis (1).
Transgenic manipulation of commensally gut or rumen microorganisms has considerable potential for improving nutrition, gut development and health in animals.
Enterococci commensally occupy the gastrointestinal tract.
Streptococci of the anginosus group can reside commensally in the human oral cavity but have a certain propensity to cause pharyngitis, bacteremia, and serious purulent infections in the deep neck and soft tissue and in internal organs such as the brain, lung, and liver (17-25).
Dogs were especially suspected because they live commensally with both pigs and humans.