term

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term

 [term]
1. a definite period, especially the period of gestation, or pregnancy.
2. a word with a specific meaning, such as one used in a limited technical vocabulary.
MeSH t's subject headings.

term

(term),
1. A definite or limited period.
See also: terminus, term infant.
2. A name or descriptive word or phrase.
See also: terminus, term infant.
[L. terminus, a limit, an end]

term

(term) a definite period, especially the period of gestation, or pregnancy.

term

(tûrm)
n.
1. A limited period of time.
2. The end of a normal gestation period.

term

Etymology: L, terminus, limit
1 a specified period of time.
2 the normal gestation period.

term

A word or string of words which are assigned a meaning or refer to a concept with a single meaning.

term

(tĕrm)
1. A definite or limited period.
2. A name or descriptive word or phrase.
[L. terminus, a limit, an end]

term

a definite period, especially the period of gestation, or pregnancy.

Patient discussion about term

Q. What does the term ‘gestational’ diabetes mean? Hi, I was wondering what does having gestational diabetes mean because I have heard some friend of mine might have it.

A. Gestational diabetes is the term for diabetes that is discovered during pregnancy, and is triggered by it. Even though it may be transient, untreated gestational diabetes can damage the health of the fetus or mother. It affects about 1 in 50 pregnancies and is nowadays often diagnosed and treated early, thanks to the screening methods (glucose challenge tests) women undertake during their pregnancies.

Q. what does the term flat affect means?

A. "Flat affect: A severe reduction in emotional expressiveness. People with depression and schizophrenia often show flat affect. A person with schizophrenia may not show the signs of normal emotion, perhaps may speak in a monotonous voice, have diminished facial expressions, and appear extremely apathetic. Also known as blunted affect."

www.medterms.com :)
couldn't said it better myself...:)

Q. What is the difference between Bipolar and depression under the medical term?

A. think of it like a light bulb. depression is an extinguished light bulb. and bipolar is a light bulb that start to light but has no boundaries, continuing intensify until the heat is so strong that it shut off again. doing that over and over again.

More discussions about term
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, Coming to Terms also identifies contemporary solutions proposed to address these failures.
Also seemingly coming to terms with First Division cricket - although from a very different perspective - are Sefton Park.
PEOPLE still coming to terms with the death of a loved one are being invited to a special bereavement service at St Peter's Church, Dunchurch, on October 30, from 2.
It's about coming to terms with your own pitfalls and establishing conscious strategies to sidestep them.
The Manchester United assistant manager is still coming to terms with the Red Devils' Champions League exit in Milan this week, the second season in succession United have tumbled out before the quarter-final stage.
For sellers, the biggest hurdle to a successful transaction is coming to terms with the true market value of their home.
The poet's struggle is, as most everyone agrees, one of coming to terms with harmony.
Worse, young people coming to terms with their sexual identity and the cruel taunts of classmates did not need the church perpetuating gays' self-loathing or giving bashers a religious rationale for violence.
But such brutal honesty has the potential of being counterproductive and self-defeating for a person who is newly diagnosed and slowly coming to terms with the diagnosis.
Parker's personal story involves coming to terms with an abortion she decided to have without adequate reflection, resulting in the loss of what was to be, as she puts it, her only child.
For years as a priest, pastor and bishop, Bishop Spong has struggled with the issues of ordinary life and the seeming intransigence of institutional Christianity in coming to terms with them.
Among them was former actor Robin Aubert's Lila, a gripping, well-written and beautifully acted love story set in the rough world of street punks; Quebec City-based Jeremy Peter Allen's Requiem contre un plafond, a very funny comedy about suicide and bad cellists starring Yves Jacques at his manic best; Jean-Francois Monette's sensible exploration of a young man's coming to terms with his emerging homosexuality in Take-Out; former rock musician Michel Gatignol's brilliantly whimsical La Venus de Milo ne peutpas se faire plaisir, a very funny explanation as to why the Venus de Milo statue lost its arms; and animator's Claude Cloutier's extraordinary Do Big Bang a mardi mat-in, an engaging and imaginative account of man's evolution, from protozoa to stuck-in-traffic businessman.