term

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term

 [term]
1. a definite period, especially the period of gestation, or pregnancy.
2. a word with a specific meaning, such as one used in a limited technical vocabulary.
MeSH t's subject headings.

term

(term),
1. A definite or limited period.
See also: terminus, term infant.
2. A name or descriptive word or phrase.
See also: terminus, term infant.
[L. terminus, a limit, an end]

term

(tûrm)
n.
1. A limited period of time.
2. The end of a normal gestation period.

term

A word or string of words which are assigned a meaning or refer to a concept with a single meaning.

term

(tĕrm)
1. A definite or limited period.
2. A name or descriptive word or phrase.
[L. terminus, a limit, an end]

Patient discussion about term

Q. What does the term ‘gestational’ diabetes mean? Hi, I was wondering what does having gestational diabetes mean because I have heard some friend of mine might have it.

A. Gestational diabetes is the term for diabetes that is discovered during pregnancy, and is triggered by it. Even though it may be transient, untreated gestational diabetes can damage the health of the fetus or mother. It affects about 1 in 50 pregnancies and is nowadays often diagnosed and treated early, thanks to the screening methods (glucose challenge tests) women undertake during their pregnancies.

Q. what does the term flat affect means?

A. "Flat affect: A severe reduction in emotional expressiveness. People with depression and schizophrenia often show flat affect. A person with schizophrenia may not show the signs of normal emotion, perhaps may speak in a monotonous voice, have diminished facial expressions, and appear extremely apathetic. Also known as blunted affect."

www.medterms.com :)
couldn't said it better myself...:)

Q. What is the difference between Bipolar and depression under the medical term?

A. think of it like a light bulb. depression is an extinguished light bulb. and bipolar is a light bulb that start to light but has no boundaries, continuing intensify until the heat is so strong that it shut off again. doing that over and over again.

More discussions about term
References in periodicals archive ?
The Echo contacted the family who said: "We are in complete shock and coming to terms with this tragedy."
"The players had just given their all and were coming to terms with the reality of relegation then had to put up with that.
Coming to Terms is a powerful book that ultimately challenges conventional understandings of Aboriginal title in South Australia.
A scholarly compendium of well-reasoned, accessible articles, Coming to Terms with Nature examines contemporary environmental concerns in a socio-political context.
This fascinating multi-generational saga explores a woman's coming to terms with her own life by developing an understanding of her roots.
Having spent two years living on site prior to constructing this modest 80sqm extension, many hours were invested in coming to terms with the lie of the land, and while sharing the place with his writer wife, Taylor was also keen to develop a strong narrative for the site; a never-ending story, that begins as you leave your car to walk the wooded path, and that continues via gate, enclosure and terrace, to infinity beyond.
It is the second time this year the newsagents and post office ( owned by Mr Noble and his wife Karen, who are still coming to terms with the death of son Luke ( has been hit.
The couple were coming to terms with a burglary on March 10 when they were again raided, this time while in the property.
Your answer will depend on how much risk you can stomach coming to terms with such unexpected art.
BOLTON'S Hidetoshi Nakata believes he is coming to terms with the physical side of the Premiership ahead of today's clash with Wigan.
It's about coming to terms with your own pitfalls and establishing conscious strategies to sidestep them.
That little cold hard fact was painful to accept, but I'm coming to terms with it."