comfrey


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

comfrey

/com·frey/ (kom´fre) the perennial herb Symphytum officinale, or a preparation of its leaves and roots, which are demulcent and astringent and are used topically for bruises and sprains and to promote bone healing; also used in folk medicine.

comfrey

(kŭm′frē)
n. pl. com·freys
Any of various hairy perennial Eurasian herbs of the genus Symphytum, especially S. officinale, having variously colored flowers in coiled cymes and long used in herbal medicine.

comfrey

a perennial herb found in the United States, Australia, and parts of Asia, also cultivated in Japan.
uses It is used for bruises, sprains, broken bones, acne, and boils. It is considered safe and possibly effective when used topically.
contraindications Medicinal teas of comfrey are considered unsafe. Use of topical comfrey is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, and in those who are hypersensitive to this product. Internal use may cause fatal hepatotoxicity. It should not be used for more than 6 weeks or topically on broken skin.
enlarge picture
Comfrey leaf

comfrey

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb, the leaves and roots of which contain allantoin, carotene, essential oil, glycosides, mucilage, resin, saponins, tannins, triterpenoids, vitamin B12 and zinc. Comfrey is a medicinal herb staple, promoting the growth of bone and connective tissue, and breaks down red blood cells (hence its popular name, bruisewort). It is anti-inflammatory, and has been used internally for haemorrhage, diarrhoea, gastric ulcers, colitis, bronchitis, whooping cough, and other respiratory tract infections; it is used topically for burns, bruises, sprains, boils, sore breasts, ulcers, gangrene, haemorrhoids and varicose veins.
 
Toxic effects
Liver tumours may develop in lab rats when exposed to high levels; it is a potential carcinogen.

comfrey,

n Latin name:
Symphytum officinale; parts used: leaves, roots; uses: wound healing, antiinflammatory for bruises and sprains; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; external use only; do not use for more than 6 weeks a year; can cause hepatotoxicity, nausea, liver adenoma. Also called
black root, blackwort, boneset, bruisewort, consound, gum plant, healing herb, knitback, knitbone, salsifly, slippery root, and
wallwort.

comfrey

References in periodicals archive ?
My records indicate that comfrey, kale, mangels and sorghum supplements reduce purchased feed costs by over 25 % during the year.
Comfrey oil, made from an infused mixture of leaves and vegetable oil, will ease aching joints and soften rough skin too.
Lavender, mints, sages, chamomile, thymes, calendula, hops, parsley, basil, rosemary, roses, savory catnip, strawberry leaves, marsh mallow, bay, verbena, comfrey.
One of the many interesting aspects of The Comfrey Report: The Story, of the World's Fastest Protein Builder and Herbal Healer, by Lawrence D.
Both the common and Latin names for comfrey come from root words meaning "to join" or "to grow together.
Of special interest to homesteaders is a one-page chapter on using comfrey as a compost activator and fertilizer.
Comfrey is not universally considered to be a food.
On the downside: Comfrey can easily become a weed if the roots are disturbed: never try to eradicate a bed of comfrey by tilling it
Caution must be taken when using comfrey, as it can speed healing so much that it can, in the case of a deep wound, cause the outside to heal before the inside.
Few herbs have been as well-known for their healing abilities as comfrey.
We "inhirited" mature plums and pears, asparagus, grapes, raspberries, horseradish, comfrey, and rhubarb.
To name but a few, alkanet, vipers bugloss, hounds tongue, borage, comfrey, lungwort and heliotrope are all close relatives of the common forget-me-not, often having very hairy, almost prickly leaves and white, blue and red flat or tubular flowers that are loved by bees.