battle fatigue

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Related to combat neurosis: Combat Stress Disorder

bat·tle fa·tigue

a term used to denote psychiatric illness consequent to the stresses of battle.
Synonym(s): shell shock
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

battle fatigue

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The approved US Army term (AR 40-216) for combat stress symptoms and reactions which
• Feel unpleasant.
• Interfere with mission performance.
• Are best treated with reassurance, rest, replenishment of physical needs, and activities which restore confidence. The condition affects soldiers after long tours of combat duty and is characterised by a loss of self-esteem, anxiety, tremulousness, depression, extreme emotional lability, dyspepsia, and dyspnea.
Battle fatigue can also be present in soldiers who have been physically wounded or who have non-battle injuries or diseases caused by stressors in the combat area. It may be necessary to treat both the battle fatigue and the other problems.

Battle fatigue may coexist with misconduct stress behaviors. However, battle fatigue itself, by definition, does not warrant legal or disciplinary action
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

battle fatigue

Posttraumatic stress disorder, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bat·tle fa·tigue

(bat'ĕl fă-tēg')
A term used to denote psychiatric illness consequent to the stresses of battle.
See also: war neurosis
Synonym(s): shell shock.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

battle fatigue

A stress syndrome, now usually called post-traumatic stress disorder, caused by prolonged exposure to the trauma of warfare. There is repetitive reliving of the painful experience, nightmares, persistent anxiety, over-alertness, irritability, restlessness, jumpiness and insomnia.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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