coma scale


Also found in: Dictionary.

co·ma scale

a clinical scale to assess impaired consciousness; assessment may include motor responsiveness, verbal performance, and eye opening, as in the Glasgow (Scotland) c.s., or the same three items and dysfunction of cranial nerves, as in the Maryland (U.S.) c.s.

co·ma scale

(kō'mă skāl)
A clinical scale to assess impaired consciousness; assessment may include motor responsiveness, verbal performance, and eye opening, as in the Glasgow (Scotland) coma scale, or the same three items and dysfunction of cranial nerves, as in the Maryland (U.S.) coma scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 There are numerous factors that influence the prognosis of TBI patients, including gender, age, severity of injury, anticoagulant use, comorbids, arrival Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and the region of affected brain on computed tomography (CT) scan.
A comparison of the Glasgow Coma Scale score to simplified alternative scores for the prediction of traumatic brain injury outcomes.
Neurological status at presentation was measured by Glasgow coma scale score.
The Glasgow Coma Scale score can usually be found in either the ambulance report or an emergency room report.
He said using the Glasgow coma scale, a neurological scale to assess the level of consciousness after head injury with 15 points being the highest, Villanueva is currently at number 4.
Emergency department vital signs included heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate (RR), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS).
General description: The Glasgow Coma Scale was developed in 1974 in Glasgow University, Scotland.
Objectives: The aim of this study was to translate the FOUR score into Swedish and to evaluate the reliability of the Swedish version compared with the reliability of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS).
We have searched for studies that met the following inclusion criteria 1) patients were older than 12 years; 2) had a severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow coma scale < 8); 3) that compared the use of ICP monitoring with control; 4) that presented an estimate of mortality/ disability prognosis (95% confidence interval) 6 months after injury.
On the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), which assesses the level of consciousness of a person, Margaret measured the lowest possible level of three, indicating she was deeply unconscious.