coma scale


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co·ma scale

a clinical scale to assess impaired consciousness; assessment may include motor responsiveness, verbal performance, and eye opening, as in the Glasgow (Scotland) c.s., or the same three items and dysfunction of cranial nerves, as in the Maryland (U.S.) c.s.

co·ma scale

(kō'mă skāl)
A clinical scale to assess impaired consciousness; assessment may include motor responsiveness, verbal performance, and eye opening, as in the Glasgow (Scotland) coma scale, or the same three items and dysfunction of cranial nerves, as in the Maryland (U.S.) coma scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, neuropsychological-scale scores, such as the Glasgow Coma Scale, have been acquired at different points after injury in different studies.
Gustorff (Aldridge, Gustorff, & Hannich, 1990) used improvised wordless singing based on the pulse tempo and breathing patterns of five coma patients with a Glascow Coma Scale rating between 4 and 7.
The Glasgow Coma Scale failed to differentiate subjects and data are not presented.
Prediction of neuropsychiatrie outcome following mild trauma brain injury: an examination of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Brain Inj.
Glasgow coma scale is a significant predictor of mortality.
However, the same comparison regarding drop in Glasgow Coma Scale was statistically not significant (p=0.073).
The patient was intubated due to a low Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8, and tube thoracostomy operation was performed on the left hemithorax.He was then admitted to the intensive care unit where he was connected to a mechanical ventilator.
The CT scan is gold standard imaging modality for head trauma whereas the Glasgow Coma Scale or GCS is a neurological scale that aims to give a reliable objective way of recording the conscious state of a person for initial as well as subsequent assessment.
Stewart made a firm impact with stunning debut The Glasgow Coma Scale and on Thursday, Caro Ramsay releases The Night Hunter.
Initially the model included five predictor variables for the two outcomes: (i) oxygen saturation (Sp[O.sub.2]) ([greater than or equal to] 90% and <90%); (ii) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (3-5 and 6-8) measured on arrival at the scene; (iii) pupil reactivity (pupils bilaterally reactive and all other findings); (iv) systolic blood pressure (SBP) (>90 mmHg and <90 mmHg); and (v) presence of a concomitant injury or not.
More victims (390) suffered severe trauma than moderate (89) or mild (225), with the researchers using the standard Glasgow coma scale to assess the seriousness of their wounds.