colpoplasty

colpoplasty

 [kol´po-plas″te]
plastic surgery involving the vagina.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vag·i·no·plas·ty

(vaj'i-nō-plas'tē),
Surgery involving the vagina.
Synonym(s): colpoplasty
[vagino- + G. plastos, formed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colpoplasty

(kŏl′pə-plăs′tē)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A blanket term for surgery to either construct or reconstruct a vagina. The procedure is formally termed neovaginoplasty in cases when a vagina did not previously exist, as is the case of XX females with congenital vaginal atresia (balloon vaginoplasty), Müllerian agenesis (Vecchietti procedure), or XY males seeking sexual reassignment (penile inversion) or Wilson procedure. The procedure is reconstructive when the vagina is damaged or lost due to trauma, cancer or radiation. Finally, there is non-constructive/non-reconstructive ‘cosmetic’ vaginoplasty, more commonly known as vaginal rejuvenation, in which the mucocutaneous tissue of the labia and lower vagina are partially excised and tightened
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vag·i·no·plas·ty

(vaj'i-nō-plas'tē)
Surgical repair of the vagina.
Synonym(s): colpoplasty.
[vagino- + G. plastos, formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although numerous surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of POP, most gynecologists in Japan have traditionally performed conventional vaginal hysterectomy, anterior and posterior colpoplasty, and circumferential suture of the levator ani muscles in women with POP, especially in those with uterine prolapse.
Clinical conditions and other antecedents: PHQ-4 (Patient Health Questionnaire: a 4-item measure of symptoms of depression) (9,10), urinary symptoms (frequency, urgency, nocturia, incontinence), intestinal symptoms (functional bowel disorders by Rome III criteria) (11): constipation, bloating, diarrhea, and blood in stool; comorbidities previously diagnosed such as inflammatory pelvic disease, migraine, low back pain, repetition urinary tract infection (three or more episodes in the last year), urinary calculi, leiomyomatosis, depression, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, abdominal surgeries (number and incision type), perineal surgeries (such as colpoplasty, hemorrhoidectomy), uterine surgeries (such as curettage, hysteroscopy).
Taylor and Hansen[7] reported five pelvic abscesses in a series of 100 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy and colpoplasty between 1950 and 1959.