colostrum


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Related to colostrum: Breastfeeding

colostrum

 [ko-los´trum]
the thin, yellow, milky fluid secreted by the mammary gland a few days before or after childbirth.

co·los·trum

(kō-los'trŭm),
A thin white opalescent fluid, the first milk secreted at the termination of pregnancy; it differs from the milk secreted later by containing more lactalbumin and lactoprotein; colostrum is also rich in antibodies that confer passive immunity to the newborn.
Synonym(s): foremilk
[L.]

colostrum

/co·los·trum/ (kol-os´trum) the thin, yellow, milky fluid secreted by the mammary gland a few days before or after parturition.

colostrum

(kə-lŏs′trəm)
n.
The thin yellowish fluid secreted by the mammary glands at the time of parturition that is rich in antibodies and minerals, and precedes the production of true milk. Also called foremilk.

co·los′tral (-trəl) adj.

colostrum

[kəlos′trəm]
Etymology: L, first milk after birth
the fluid secreted by the breast during pregnancy and the first days after the delivery before lactation begins. It consists of immunologically active substances (maternal antibodies) and white blood cells, water, protein, fat, minerals, vitamins, and carbohydrate in a thin, yellow serous fluid. Compare breast milk.

colostrum

Fringe medicine
The milk produced by mammals after giving birth, which, given its high content of antibodies, is believed to serve as an immune system enhancer. Bovine colostrum in the form of pills, powders and ointments has been marketed as treatment for arthritis, cancer, various infections, multiple sclerosis and other conditions.
 
There are no peer-reviewed data to support the efficacy of colostrum.

colostrum

Obstetrics A sticky yellow-white fluid secreted by the breasts from late pregnancy to several days after birth, but before breast milk is produced. See Breast milk.

co·los·trum

(kŏ-los'trŭm)
A thin white opalescent fluid, the first milk secreted at the termination of pregnancy; it differs from the milk secreted later by containing more lactalbumin and lactoprotein; colostrum is also rich in antibodies which confer passive immunity to the newborn.
Synonym(s): foremilk.
[L.]

colostrum

The yellowish, protein-rich, milk-like fluid secreted by the breasts for the first two or three days after the birth of a baby. Colostrum contains large fat globules and a high content of antibodies.

colostrum

a yellowish, watery secretion expressed from the breast nipples of female mammals when in late pregnancy and for a few days after birth. Colostrum has a high protein content and is rich in vitamin A and ANTIBODIES which give the baby an immediate, short-term, passive immunity to foreign ANTIGENS.

colostrum (k·läˑ·strm),

n 1. bovine prelactation secretion that contains antibodies and other immune system–activating substances. Claimed to treat infections, autoimmune diseases, lyme disease, and inflammatory bowel disease. No known precautions, although the possibility of prior contamination exists in bovine products.
2. human mammary secretion that contains living immune cells, immune factors, and antibodies. Produced in the first few days of lactation.

colostrum

the thick, yellow secretion present in the mammary gland in increasing amounts for several days or weeks, depending on the species, before and for about a week after parturition. It is very rich in maternal antibodies and is essential in providing passive immunity to the neonate. An adequate amount of colostrum must be ingested during the first few hours after birth while the intestinal epithelium is still permeable to the large molecules of the immunoglobulins.
Immunoglobulin levels in colostrum vary between species and are much higher than those found later in the milk. The predominant immunoglobulin in colostrum is IgG. Called also beestings.

colostrum-induced anemia
occurs in lambs fed cow colostrum; thought to be an immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.
colostrum replacements
commercially available products containing immunoglobulins derived from the processing of serum collected at cattle slaughter or second-milking colostrum purchased from dairies. The majority have sub-optimal concentrations of immunoglobulin to replace natural colostrum. Some are labeled as colostrum supplements but marketed as colostrum replacements.
synthetic colostrum
although referred to as colostrum, formulas can only attempt to duplicate milk of a particular species since they are lacking in immunoglobulins. See milk replacer.
colostrum vacuoles
eosinophilic colostrum present in vacuoles in cytoplasm of intestinal epithelial cells in newborn animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the milk or colostrum is gone, add another 6ml more water to rinse the syringe.
A greater intake of immunoglobulins in colostrum may increase immune function in nursing pigs.
Effects of newborn characteristics and length of colostrum feeding period on passive immune transfer in goat kids.
Precolostrm and colostrum samples were collected, at each milking in a 50 ml clean tube, and stored at -20[degrees]C for further analysis.
This is one of the first studies to document such diversity using the pyrosequencing technique (a large scale DNA sequencing determination technique) on colostrum samples on the one hand, and breast milk on the other, the latter being collected after one and six months of breastfeeding," co-authors, Maria Carmen Collado from the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA-CSIC) and Alex Mira, researcher at the Higher Public Health Research Centre (CSISP-GVA), said.
Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) in Clay Center, Nebraska, have developed a measuring technique referred to as the "immunocrit" that can determine whether neonatal piglets have received adequate colostrum from the sow.
To produce hyperimmune colostrum of ewes and does by vaccinating them during their pregnancy and to examine the performance of their lambs/kids receiving the colostrum from the dams.
Present study was intended to evaluate the effect of vitamin E and selenium supplementation on passive transfer of antibodies in colostrum and calves against FMD and HS vaccine.
Initially after birth, your breasts produce small amounts of a rich, nutritious milk called colostrum, which midwives often refer to as "liquid gold.